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A

HISTORY OF GOD

Karen Armstrong 1993

The God of the Mystics

Page 250

"Perhaps the most famous of the early Jewish mystical texts is the fifth century Sefer Yezirah (The Book of Creation). There is no attempt to describe the creative process realistically; the account is unashamedly symbolic and shows God creating the world by means of language as though he were writing a book. But language has been entirely transformed and the message of creation is no longer clear. Each letter of the Hebrew alphabet is given a numerical value; by combining the letters with the sacred numbers, rearranging them in endless configurations, the mystic weaned his mind away from the normal connotations of words."

 

 

THERE IS NO ATTEMPT MADE TO DESCRIBE THE CREATIVE PROCESS REALISTICALLY

THE ACCOUNT IS SYMBOLIC AND SHOWS GOD CREATING THE WORLD BY MEANS OF LANGUAGE

AS THOUGH WRITING A BOOK BUT LANGUAGE ENTIRELY TRANSFORMED

THE MESSAGE OF CREATION IS CLEAR EACH LETTER OF

THE

ALPHABET

IS

GIVEN

A

NUMERICAL

VALUE BY COMBINING THE LETTERS WITH THE SACRED NUMBERS

REARRANGING THEM IN ENDLESS CONFIGURATIONS

THE MYSTIC WEANED THE MIND AWAY FROM THE NORMAL CONNOTATIONS OF WORDS

 

 

KEEPER OF GENESIS

A

QUEST

FOR THE HIDDEN LEGACY OF MANKIND

Robert Bauval Graham Hancock

1996

Return to the Beginning

Page 283

'I stand before the masters who witnessed the genesis, who were the authors of their own forms, who walked the dark, circuitous passages of their own becoming. . .

I stand before the masters who witnessed the transformation of the body of a man into the body in spirit, who were witnesses to resurrection when the corpse of Osiris entered the mountain and the soul of Osiris walked out shining. . . when he came forth from death, a shining thing, his face white with heat. . .

I stand before the masters who know the histories of the dead, who decide which tales to hear again, who judge the books of lives as either fun or empty, who are themselves authors of truth. And they are Isis and Osiris, the divine intelligences. And when the story is written and the end is good and the soul of a man is perfected, with a shout they lift him into heaven. . .'

Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead (Norrnandi Ellis translation)

 

 

I

THAT

AM

AT MAAT AM

 

 

The Official Graham Hancock Website: Library ... of a chapter from the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, Reu Nu Pert Em Hru, ... These are the 42 Judges or Assessors of the Dead, before each of whom the ...www.grahamhancock.com/library/hm/c4

 

Chapter 4
In the Hall of the Double Truth

The ancient Egyptians believed that the deceased must journey after death through the eerie parallel universe of the Duat - which is at once a starry "otherworld" and a strange physical domain with narrow passageways and darkened galleries and chambers populated by fiends and terrors. On this journey the jackal-headed mortuary god Anubis would sometimes act as a guide and companion to the soul.
On the west bank of the Nile, opposite Luxor and Karnak, stands the strange and beautiful temple of Deir el Medina - which, like Edfu and Dendera, is a product of the final days of the once-remarkable civilization of ancient Egypt. Dedicated in the third century BC to Maat, the Egyptian goddess of cosmic equilibrium, its walls are inscribed with hieroglyphic texts expressing archaic religious and spiritual ideas.


Detail (omitted) from the "weighing of the soul", Deir el Medina. Top, some of the Assessors who hear the 42 Negative Confessions; left, ibis-headed Thoth, god of wisdom, records the verdict; centre, Ammit, the Eater of the Dead, the agency of the soul's extinction; right, Osiris, Judge of the Dead and agency of the soul's resurrection.

Complete scene of the weighing of the soul, Deir el Medina.
The temple is built around an axis oriented south-east to north-west. We entered it through a gate in the south-eastern wall leading to a courtyard dominated by four elaborately adorned columns with floral capitals. Beyond these we passed into a central hall at the end of which we came to three doorways leading into three separate enclosed shrines. The southernmost of these shrines, dark and unprepossessing though it seemed at first, proved to contain a finely crafted and almost complete scene of what scholars describe as the Psychostasia, or Weighing-of-the-Heart (derived from the Greek psyche = soul, i.e. heart, and stasis = balance).

We took time to examine this scene, which consists of a chapter from the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, Reu Nu Pert Em Hru, literally the "Book of Coming Forth By Day", one of a large corpus of funerary texts copied and recopied at all periods of Egyptian history, that concerned themselves with "the freedom granted to spirit forms which survived death to come and go as they pleased".

Standing in the doorway of the shrine our eyes were drawn to the wall on our left containing an elegant relief of Ptolemy IV Philopator (ruled 221–205 BC), the Macedonian Greek Pharaoh on whose orders this Temple of Maat was built. Represented as a deceased soul, dressed in sandals and a simple linen kilt, this scene shows him being ushered into a spacious hall at the head of which, in partially mummified form, sits Osiris, the high god of death and resurrection, identified in the ancient Egyptian sky-religion with the great southern constellation of Orion.

The place to which Ptolemy has been brought is sometimes referred to as the Judgement Hall of Osiris, and sometimes as the Hall of the Double Maati - which translates as "the Hall of the Two Truths" or possibly "the Hall of Double Justice". It is not a place to which the soul was believed to have come immediately after death. Indeed, it could only be reached by those who were spiritually "equipped" to complete a long and hazardous post-mortem journey through the first five of the twelve divisions of the Duat - the fearful parallel dimension, shadowy and terrifying, filled with fiends and nightmares, that was believed by the ancient Egyptians to separate the land of the living from the kingdom of the blessed dead. The reader will recall that it was this same Duat, referred to as the Duat-N-Ba (the "netherworld of the soul"), that was said to have provided the model for the mysterious "primeval temple" spoken of in the Edfu Building Texts.

Ptolemy stands in the posture of salutation, left hand clenched across his right breast, right hand raised. On either side of him is a figure of Maat (hence "Double Maati") - a tall and beautiful goddess, sensual and full-breasted, wearing a head-dress topped by her characteristic ostrich-feather plume (the hieroglyph for "Truth"). The figure behind Ptolemy is empty-handed, and seems to be guiding him into the hall; the figure facing him holds in her right hand a long staff and in her left hand the hieroglyph ankh, the "cross" or "key" of life - the symbol of eternity.

In a double row at the side of the Hall 42 dispassionate figures crouch in the manner of scribes pouring over papyrus, each wearing the feather of Maat. These are the 42 Judges or Assessors of the Dead, before each of whom the deceased must be able to declare himself innocent of a particular wrong - the 42 so-called "Negative Confessions". For example:

No. 4 "I have not stolen";

No. 5 "I have not slain man or woman";

No. 6 "I have not uttered falsehood";

No. 19 "I have not defiled the wife of a man";

No. 38 "I have not cursed the God".


The goddess Nepthys, benefactor and protector of the dead. Tomb of Seti I, Valley of the Kings. Nepthys was the mother of Anubis.
Having completed this stage of his examination, Ptolemy now finds himself confronted by an immense pair of scales beneath the arms of which are to be seen representations of Anubis, the jackal-headed guide of souls, and Horus the falcon-headed son of Osiris. One pan of the scales contains an object, shaped like a small urn, symbolizing the heart of the deceased, "considered to be the seat of intelligence and thus the instigator of man's actions and his conscience". In the other pan stands the feather of Maat, symbolizing once again ... Truth.

On this encounter of the heart with Truth everything hinges.

For at this moment an irrevocable Judgement will be passed which will offer the prospect of eternal life to the soul that triumphs, and eternal annihilation to the soul that fails. Beyond the scales is depicted the agency of the soul's extinction: a monstrous hybrid, part crocodile, part lion, part hippopotamus, who is known as Ammit, the "Devourer", the "Eater of the Dead". And beyond Ammit, seated in majesty on his throne at the extreme right of the scene, our eyes are drawn again towards the mummified figure of the star-god Osiris, the agency of the soul's resurrection.

Horus and Anubis test the scales, and proceed to measure the weight. Meanwhile, to the immediate right of the scales, between the deceased and the snarling, slavering jaws of Ammit, we observe the tall ibis-headed figure of Thoth, the "personification of the mind of god ... the all-pervading and directing power of heaven and earth ... the inventor of astronomy and astrology, the science of numbers and mathematics, geometry and land surveying". Mysteriously referred to in archaic inscriptions as "three times great, great", Thoth was the ancient Egyptian god of wisdom, "the recorder of souls", who - from Ptolemaic times onwards - would also come to be known to the Greeks under the name of Hermes Trismegistus ("Hermes the Thrice Great"). In the Judgement Scene he is shown as a powerful man dressed in a short tunic, wearing his characteristic avian head-mask. In his left hand he holds up a palette and in his right a fine reed pen.

Heart and feather stand poised in equilibrium, as they must if the soul is to be admitted to the afterlife kingdom of Osiris.

Horus confirms the balance.

Anubis announces the verdict.

Thoth records ...

 

Page 2
Chapter 4
In the Hall of the Double Truth (cont)
Thoth and Maat

Hypostyle hall, Karnak: Thoth, the god of wisdom (ibis-headed, left) writes the name of Pharaoh Seti I (centre) on the tree of life. In later times Thoth became known to the Greeks as Hermes Trismegistus. He was the keeper of the knowledge that opened the door to immortality.

The scales of Maat.

The goddess Maat, personification of truth, justice and cosmic harmony.

Osiris, flanked by two Eyes of Horus, stands before an offering table, tomb of Sennedjum.
The deities Thoth and Maat are present in the earliest surviving scriptures of mankind - the ancient Egyptian Pyramid Texts of the third millennium BC - and continue to play pivotal spiritual and cosmic roles throughout the entire 3000-year span of Pharaonic history. Standing either side of Atum-Ra, the sun-god, as he sails the celestial ocean in his "boat of millions of years", they are portrayed in the Book of the Dead as eternal presences or principles whose function is to guide and balance the motion of the universe: "Thoth ... Lord ... self-created, to whom none hath given birth ... he who reckons in heaven, the counter of the stars, the enumerator of the earth and of what is therein, and the measurer of the earth". Elsewhere we read: "The land of Manu [the West] receiveth thee [Ra, the sun-god] with satisfaction, and the goddess Maat embraceth thee both at morn and at eve ... the god Thoth and the goddess Maat have written down thy daily course for you every day."

The word maat has many meanings in addition to "truth" - for example, "that which is straight", and, in the physical and moral sense, "right, real, genuine, upright, righteous, just, steadfast, unalterable", etc. Khebest maat is "real lapis-lazuli" as opposed to blue paste. Shes maat means "ceaselessly and regularly". Em un maat indicates that a thing is really so. The man who is good and honest is maat. And the truth, maat, "is great and mighty and it hath never been broken since the time of Osiris". It is perhaps not surprising that in some versions of the Psychostasia the goddess Maat, with her arms outstretched, takes the form of the scales themselves.


Stupa of Bodinath, Buddhist temple, Kathmandu, Nepal.

Eyes of Horus, tomb of Sennedjum, Luxor west bank.
The feather and the heart, the two objects weighed in these scales, combine to convey a potent symbolic message. The former, as we have seen, is the type and symbol of the goddess herself, whilst it cannot be an accident that the latter, resembling a small vase with two handles, is not only used as the ancient Egyptian hieroglyph for "heart" but also forms the "determinitive" (defining sign) of the word tekh, "a weight". From this etymology - tekh through tehuti - some scholars derive the origins of the name Thoth, a derivation which the Egyptians themselves appear to have favoured. Let us also note in passing that the towering granite obelisks found in temples along the Nile were called tekhen by the ancient Egyptians - "a word of unknown origin" according to Martina D'Alton of New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art.

As we shall see in later chapters, obelisks played a special role in the quest for immortality that was pursued for millennia by Egypt's high initiates. From the remotest times this quest was intimately associated with the cult of Thoth, whose will and power were believed to keep the forces of heaven and earth in equilibrium: "it was his great skill in celestial mechanics," observed Sir E. A. Wallis Budge, "which made proper use of the laws (maat) upon which the foundation and maintenance of the universe rested".

After an exhaustive analysis of funerary texts from all periods of ancient Egyptian history, Budge also comments on the manner in which Thoth is ubiquitously portrayed as possessing "unlimited power" in the afterlife realm of the Duat. It is this power that is symbolized by his role as recording angel in the Judgement Scene. According to the Book of What is in the Duat (numerous representations of which survive in the tombs of Pharaohs from the Eighteenth Dynasty onwards): "The examination of the words takes place, and he [Thoth] strikes down wickedness - he who has a just heart, he who bears the words in the scales - in the divine place of the examination of the mystery of mysteries of the spirits."

But what exactly is meant by "wickedness" and what is the real nature of the mystery that is examined in the Judgement Hall of Osiris?

 

Page 3

Chapter 4
In the Hall of the Double Truth (cont)
The Books of Thoth

Detail from the Book of Gates, tomb of Rameses VI, Valley of the Kings. Like the Book of What is in the Duat, the Book of Gates depicts a journey through the Duat. The journey is by boat. In it, protected by the coils of a cosmic serpent, the sun god Ra stands flanked by the figures of "Mind" (fore) and "Magic" (aft). In the Book of Gates the Judgement Hall of Osiris occupies the Sixth Division of the Duat.
At stake in the Judgement Scene is something more than moral character. This is clear because questions pertaining to moral behaviour are addressed at quite an early stage in the proceedings by the soul of the deceased. This is the function of the 42 Negative Confessions. It follows, therefore, that the "weighing" of the heart must be an evaluation of something else - a measuring of some other quality or character or "truth" that the individual has been given the opportunity to add to during the course of his or her life. It is even possible that this may be the source of the Judgement Hall's "Double Truth" - the concept that it is a place where two distinct and different levels of assessment must be undergone. This would explain why, as one eminent authority has observed:

the testing of the soul in the Balance in the Hall of Osiris is not described as the judging or "weighing of actions" [which the 42 Negative Confessions certainly are] but as utcha metet, the "weighing of words".
Additional light is shed on this curious formula when we remember that Thoth was regarded by the ancient Egyptians as a god who could teach "not only words of power but the manner in which to utter them". Knowledge of these "words" was believed to be essential if the deceased was to hope to complete his afterlife quest through all twelve of the "Divisions" of the Duat:

The words ... must be learned from Thoth, and without knowledge of them, and of the proper manner in which they should be said, the deceased could never make his way through the Duat. The formulae of Thoth opened the secret pylons for him, and provided him with the necessary meat, and drink, and apparel, and repelled baleful fiends and evil spirits, and they gave him the power to know the secret or hidden names of the monsters of the Duat, and to utter them in such a way that they became his friends and helped him on his journey ...
It was believed that Reu Nu Pert Em Hru, the Book of the Dead - "a sort of Baedeker for the transmigration of the soul" - was a composition of Thoth and that certain chapters of it had been written "with his own fingers". In addition numerous passages from the ancient texts have survived in which we learn that the wisdom god was also seen as the author of certain other "books" - books which anyone who sought the prize of immortality should attempt to discover during his lifetime: "I am endowed with glory, I am endowed with strength, I am filled with might, I am supplied with the books of Thoth and I have brought them to enable me to pass through ..."

What the texts imply is that only he or she who has sought and found the books of Thoth can attain eternity. "How long have I to live" the deceased asks in some versions of the Judgement Scene. If all is well at the "weighing of words" Thoth replies by offering the coveted prize: "Thou art for millions of years, a period of life of millions of years ..."

 

Page 4
Chapter 4
In the Hall of the Double Truth (cont)
A Quest for Knowledge
According to Clemens Alexandrinus (Stromata VI) there were 42 books of Thoth, a number that provides a curious sense of balance with the "first truth" - the "weighing of actions" - examined by means of the 42 Negative Confessions. These books of the "second truth" - the "weighing of words" - were thought to be divided into seven categories covering, amongst other subjects, cosmography and geography, the construction of temples, the history of the world, the worship of the gods, medical matters, the hidden meaning of hieroglyphics, and treatises on astrology and astronomy including "the ordering of the fixed stars, the positions of the sun, moon and planets, the conjunctions and phases of the sun and the moon, and the times when stars rise".

The tradition of the books of Thoth persisted well into the Christian era, associated with Graeco-Egyptian temples such as Deir el Medina, Dendera, Edfu and the Temple of Isis at Philae where the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs continued to be used and understood until as late as the fourth century AD. It is therefore hardly surprising that Clemens (AD 150–215) should have been aware of this tradition which was, indeed, set down afresh in writing in his adopted city of Alexandria at about this time. These writings, the so-called Corpus Hermeticum, repeatedly describe Thoth (the "Hermes Trismegistus" of the Greeks) as "he who won knowledge of all". He:

saw all things, and seeing understood, and understanding had the power both to disclose and to give explanation. For what he knew he graved on stone; yet though he graved them onto stone he hid them mostly, keeping sure silence [so] that every younger age of cosmic time might seek for them ...
A quest, then, appears to have been envisaged for these stone tablets, or "books", of Thoth/Hermes. Indeed the Corpus Hermeticum leaves us in no doubt about this matter, telling us that the wisdom god used magic to postpone for as long as possible the rediscovery of his treasures of knowledge:

Ye holy books ... which have been anointed with the drug of imperish-ability ... remain ye undecaying through all ages, and be ye unseen and undiscovered by all men who shall go to and fro on the plains of this land, until the time when Heaven, grown old, shall beget organisms worthy of you.
Walter Scott, the translator of this passage into English, appends the following explanatory note concerning the term "organisms": "Literally 'composite things'; that is, men composed of soul and body. After long ages there will be born men that are worthy to read the books of Hermes."

 

Page 5
Chapter 4
In the Hall of the Double Truth (cont)
A Serpent which Cannot Die ...
The urge to read them must be very old because it can be traced back deep into ancient Egyptian times, long before the compilation of the Corpus Hermeticum. For example, a papyrus of the Ptolemaic period preserves the story of a certain Setnau-Khaem-Uast, a son of Rameses II (ruled 1290–1224 BC), who sought for a "book written by Thoth himself". Information had come Setnau's way, as a result of diligent research, that this book - which was said to contain a spell capable of granting immortality - lay concealed in an antique tomb in the Memphite necropolis (an extensive burial area stretching for some 35 kilometres along the west bank of the Nile from Meidum to Giza):

Setnau went there with his brother and passed three days and nights seeking for the tomb ... and on the third day they found it. Setnau recited some words over it, and the earth opened and they went down to the place where the book was. When the two brothers came into the tomb they found it to be brilliantly lit up by the light which came forth from the book.
Another papyrus, this time from the Middle Kingdom (the Westcar Papyrus, circa 1650 BC), preserves an even older story from the time of Khufu (ruled 2551–2528 BC), the supposed builder of the Great Pyramid of Giza. The papyrus speaks of a "building called 'Inventory'", located at the sacred city of Heliopolis (18 kilometres north-east of Giza), in which was stored "a chest of flint" containing a mysterious object that Khufu is reported to have "spent much time searching for". The context suggests it could have been a document of some kind because it recorded the "number of the secret chambers of the sanctuary of Thoth".

It is generally agreed that the Westcar Papyrus reports - or at any rate touches upon - real events. According to Professor I. E. S. Edwards it contains a "kernel of truth" and "was certainly a copy of an older document". Edwards further points out that Heliopolis, the site of the "Inventory Building", had been a centre of astronomical and astrological science in Egypt since times immemorial and that the title of the high priest of that city was "Chief of the Astronomers".

The Egyptologist F. W. Green expresses the opinion that the "Inventory building" could well have been a "chart room" at Heliopolis "or perhaps a 'drawing room' where plans were made and stored". Similarly, Sir Alan H. Gardner argues that "the room in question must have been an archive" and that Khufu "was seeking for details concerning the secret chambers of the primeval sanctuary of Thoth".

The central image of the Westcar Papyrus of some great secret of Thoth lying sealed away in a box is repeated in another text which tells how the wisdom god had deposited one of his books "in an iron box in the middle of the Nile at Coptos" (an ancient site some kilometres to the north of Luxor):

The iron box is in a bronze box, the bronze box is in a box of palm-tree wood, the palm-tree wood box is in a box of ebony and ivory, the ebony and ivory box is in a silver box, the silver box is in a gold box ... The box wherein is the book is surrounded by swarms of serpents and scorpions and reptiles of all kinds, and round it is coiled a serpent which cannot die.
Last but not least amongst many similar sources that we could cite, there is a Coffin Text, circa 1900 BC, that speaks of the journey of the soul towards immortality. "I open the chest of Thoth", states the deceased, "I break the seal ... I open what the boxes of the god contain, I lift out the documents ..."

So there is a sense in all of this that what is weighed in the Judgement Scene at the "weighing of words" must in some way have to do with the possession of knowledge by the deceased, the kind of knowledge that can be inscribed on to tablets of stone or written down in books and "documents".

 

Page 6

Chapter 4
In the Hall of the Double Truth (cont)
The Word
Like so many of the other funerary and rebirth texts of ancient Egypt, the Coffin Texts are manuals to guide the afterlife journey of the soul - the terrifying quest in the dark valley of the Duat that culminates with the Judgement Scene. The texts are so called because they were inscribed inside coffins, presumably so as to be easily accessible to the dead. They date from the First Intermediate Period (2134–2040 BC) and were particularly favoured during the Twelfth Dynasty (1991–1783 BC). In the early spells we read:

The young god [the deceased entering the afterlife kingdom of Osiris having found immortality] is born of the beautiful West, having come here from the land of the living; he has got rid of the dust which was on him, he has filled his body with magic, he has quenched his thirst with it ... he has mastered the land through what he knew.
In a later spell an almost identical formula occurs:

See, Your Majesty has come, you have acquired all power, and nothing has been left behind by you ... You have filled your body with magic, you have quenched your thirst with it ... you have mastered the land with what you know like those to whom you have gone down.
And later still we read of the triumph of the "equipped spirit" and may begin to guess as to what it is with which he is "equipped":

I have passed over the paths of Osiris; they are in the limit of the sky. As for him who knows this spell for going down into them, he himself is a god, in the suite of Thoth; he will go down to any sky to which he wishes to go down to. But as for him who does not know this spell for passing over these paths, he shall be taken into the infliction of the dead which is ordained, as one who is nonexistent.

 

Page 7

Chapter 4
In the Hall of the Double Truth (cont)
Celestial Co-ordinates

The Grand Gallery of the Great Pyramid.

The descending corridor. Scholars have as yet failed to consider the possibility that the Pyramids and perhaps even the Sphinx of Giza could have been built as three-dimensional models of the "inner world" of the Duat-places of preparation in which initiates may have been selected to immerse themselves, perhaps in total darkness, perhaps for days, in order to gain foreknowledge of the afterlife realm. Yet there is nothing inherently improbable about such a proposition. We already know that the various ancient Egyptian "books of the dead" provide textual explanations and visual images of the Duat with the explicit purpose of preparing the deceased for the afterlife journey. To create a large-scale three-dimensional "model" of the Duat - a sort of simulated Netherworld - would be no more than an extension of this practice.

Detail from the Book of What is in the Duat, tomb of Thutmosis III, Valley of the Kings. Astronomically, the Duat was located in the sky between the constellations of Orion and Leo, but it was also a parallel universe which was always depicted as a maze of narrow corridors and passageways and rising galleries and chambers, populated by monsters. Compare to the passageway system of the Great Pyramid, facing page.

The Subterranean Chamber of the Great Pyramid.


Scenes from the Book of What is in the Duat, tomb of Thutmosis III.

The sky region of the Duat on the summer solstice circa 2500 BC-also showing the trajectory of Orion until its culmination at the meridian.
There can be no dispute that the equipped spirit was thought to master the land of the Duat with "what he knew". But what exactly was this knowledge? The suggestion in the texts that it was used to "go down to any sky" hints very strongly that astronomy might have been involved. This accords with what has been learnt concerning the astronomical interests of the priests of Heliopolis. It also makes sense of an important characteristic of the Duat to which few modern Egyptologists have paid attention: the afterlife region was not at any time conceived of by the ancient Egyptians as an "underworld" in the conventional Judaeo-Christian sense. On the contrary, as Dr R. O. Faulkner of the British Museum long ago observed, it is better described as a "netherworld" since it was "part of the visible sky".

In fact the Duat had very specific celestial co-ordinates. The first systematic attempt to chart these co-ordinates was undertaken in the 1940s by the Egyptologist Selim Hassan. Through a painstaking study of a mass of funerary and rebirth texts he established that the Duat had been conceived of by the ancient Egyptians as having been "localized in the eastern part of the sky" when the bright star Sirius - identified with the goddess Isis - and the stars of the Orion constellation - Osiris - were visible there in the pre-dawn. This was clear, he reasoned, from passages in the oldest texts which tell us: "Orion has been enveloped by the Duat while he who lives on the Horizon purifies himself. Sothis [Sirius] has been enveloped by the Duat while he who lives on the Horizon purifies himself." Hassan understood that such passages must have been based on observational astronomy:

as the sun rises and purifies himself in the Horizon, the stars Orion and Sothis are enveloped by the Duat. This is a true observation of nature, and it really appears as though the stars are swallowed up each morning by the increasing glow of the dawn. Perhaps the determinative of the word Duat, the star within a circle, illustrates this idea of the enveloping of a star.
More recently the author Robert Bauval has been able to pin down the location of the Duat in time and space still further with a crucial observation that Hassan missed. Because of the earth's orbit, the background stars against which the sun is seen to rise each morning very slowly change throughout the course of the solar year. This means that the sun does not rise in concert with Orion and Sirius on every dawn, but only at certain and specific dawns (when the sun lies roughly between the earth and these stars). Furthermore, because of another characteristic motion of the earth, the season in which the "swallowing up" of Orion and Sirius takes place also very slowly changes. This motion is precession, which retards the moment of the sun's arrival at any given stellar "address" at the rate of one degree every 72 years.

Precessional calculations for 2500–2300 BC - when the oldest surviving funerary texts from ancient Egypt were supposedly compiled - indicate that in that epoch the Duat could only have been regarded as being "active" (i.e. with Orion and Sirius rising just ahead of the sun) at around the summer solstice - the longest day of the year. At this time, and at no other season, would it have been believed to open its gates to the assembled souls of the dead. At one gate stood the constellation of Leo. At the other, divided from Leo by the glowing river of the Milky Way, stood Sirius, Orion and the constellation of Taurus. In 2500 BC this sacred portal in the heavens was said to "open" at the summer solstice because the sun rose in it at that time of the year. Today, because of the effects of precession, the sun "swallows up" Orion and Sirius at the autumnal equinox. In 10,500 BC phenomenon could only have been witnessed on the spring equinox.

Is it possible that the initiate's skill at "going down to any sky" could be a reference to an ability to make precessional calculations - i.e. to harness intellect to imagination and to visualize the skies of former and future epochs?

Was it such knowledge that was believed to be sufficiently powerful to counterbalance the feather of Maat on the scales of Judgement and to triumph over nonexistence?

This is the word which is in darkness. As for any spirit who knows it he will live among the living ... he will never perish ... he will never die.

Page 8

Chapter 4
In the Hall of the Double Truth (cont)
Superstition, or Science?
Undeniably powerful and even disturbing, the ideas conveyed in the funerary and rebirth texts of ancient Egypt have been described by Dr Stephen Quirke, Curator of the Department of Egyptian Antiquities at the British Museum, as belonging to an:

everlasting world ... in which the endeavour to outlast eternity reaches its most self-conscious. [They] spell out the precise phrasing by which a dead person could be made into an eternally rejuvenated being. Today we call these ancient texts "funerary literature", but this technical term does them little justice: these are texts to transfigure the dead, to make human beings into immortal gods.

Book of What is In the Duat: the spiritualization of the deceased, flanked by two Eyes of Horus amidst a landscape of stars and winged serpents.

The "sarcophagus" in the King's Chamber of the Great Pyramid. If the Pyramid was built as a model of the Duat then the sarcophagus may have been used as part of the initiate's preparation for his own inevitable death and afterlife journey and hoped-for rebirth.
The ancient Egyptians themselves often called the texts sakhu, Quirke reports:

meaning recitations that would turn a person after death into an akh, "a transfigured spirit". The only alternative was to die and remain mut, "dead". These opposites of akh and mut are roughly equivalent to the European contrast between the blessed and the damned. As in the European tradition, paradise is envisaged in terms of light, and the word akh itself is one of a group in which the idea of light and radiance is paramount, such as the Egyptian for "horizon", akhet, the home of light. Faced with the alternative, the Egyptians concentrated all their resources into securing this eternal radiance.

Seti I Temple, Abydos: Isis, goddess of magic, offers ankh, the gift of eternal life, to the soul of Pharaoh Seti I. Behind the symbolism, and the ethereal beauty of the reliefs, the sense of a lofty and ancient purpose animates the sacred art of Egypt.
In other words, although Quirke does recognize the lofty goal expressed in the texts - to transform human beings into immortal gods - he believes that it was sought for reasons that are largely psychological. Quite simply, he argues, the ancient Egyptians found the alternatives to eternal life - nonexistence, annihilation - too horrible to contemplate and therefore created an elaborate fantasy world which they imagined that their souls could enter and in which, if suitably "equipped", they hoped that they might win the prize of immortality.

In line with Quirke's view, it has become customary amongst Egyptologists today to disparage the texts as little more than wishful thinking - "a strange accretion of spells and mumbo-jumbo ... a reflection of humanity's earliest supreme revolt against the darkness and silence from which none returns". Some scholars have even gone so far as to insist that:

In spite of their meticulous attention to detail in practical matters, the Egyptians of the Pyramid Age never evolved a clear and precise conception of the After-Life ... The impression made on the modern mind is that of a people searching in the dark for a key to truth and, having found not one but many keys resembling the pattern of the lock, retaining all lest perchance the appropriate one should be discarded.
Similarly Dr Margaret Murray observes that "the horror of death is very marked in the religious texts of the Egyptians ... Knowing that death is inevitable [the Egyptian] tried to prepare for it by a knowledge of the magic which would enable him to come back to the land and home he loved so well ..."

It is the fundamental proposition of Heaven's Mirror that matters are by no means so simple and that the Egyptian scriptures contain extraordinary material with an importance vastly deeper and darker than mere mumbo-jumbo, and far, far older than scholars have imagined.

 

 

DISMEMBERED AND REMEMBERED

REMEMBERED AND DISMEMBERED

ALL IN ALL

THE ONLY RIGHT WAY TO DIE

 

 

THE

SCALES

THAT

QUIVER AND NOW DELIVER

 

 

THE

HOURS OF HORUS

IS

ARRIVED

HURRAH FOR RAH FOR RAH HURRAH

AMEN THAT NAME GODS NAME AMEN

RA IN BOW LIGHT GODS LIGHT RA IN BOW

THE LIGHT IS RISEN NOW RISEN IS THE LIGHT

 

 

JOSEPH AND HIS BROTHERS

Thomas Mann

1875 - 1955

JOSEPH THE PROVIDER

Page 967

"But I am King, and teacher; I may not think what I cannot teach. Whereas such a one very soon learns not even to think the unteachable."
Here Tiy, his mother, cleared her throat, rattled her ornaments, and said, looking ahead of her into space:
"Pharaoh is to be praised when he practises statesmanship in matters of religious belief and spares the simplicity of the many. That is why I warned him not to wound the popular attachment to Usir, king of the lower regions. There is no contradiction between knowing and sparing, in this connection; and the office of teacher need not darken knowledge. Never have priests taught the multitude all they themselves know. They have told them what was wholesome, and wisely left in the realm of the mysteries what was not beneficial. Thus knowledge and wisdom are together in the world, truth and forbearance. The mother recommends that it so remain."
"Thank you, Mama," said Amenhotep, with a deprecating bow. "Thank you for the contribution. It is very valuable and will for / Page 968 / eternal ages be held in honour. But we are speaking of two different things. My Majesty speaks of the fetters which the teaching puts upon the thoughts of God; yours refers to priestly statecraft, which divides teaching and knowledge. But Pharaoh would not be arrogant, and there is no greater arrogance than such a division. No, there is no arrogance in the world greater than that of dividing the children of our Father into initiate and uninitiate and teaching double words: all-knowingly for the masses, knowingly in the inner circle. No, we must speak what we know, and witness what we have seen. Pharaoh wants to do nothing but improve the teaching, even though it be made hard for him by the teaching.

 

 

THE DEATH OF FOREVER

A NEW FUTURE FOR HUMAN CONSCIOUSNESS

Darryl Reanney 1991

Page 101

"The basis of our consciousness is cyclic and repetitive. After ten years of life, a child has experienced about 3650 day/night cycles. Its psychology has been totally and irreversibily structured in terms of this periodicity; it accepts unconsciously, instinctively, that light follows dark.

This periodic and reiterative structure of consciousness is encoded in our very speech. The latin prefix 're' usually has the sense /Page 102/ of 'again' Can it be coincidence that the words we use to describe our fundamental myths and activities are not things we do but things we do again?

reproduction redemption representation reincarnation recognition rebirth resurrection

Even the word re-ligion may fit this pattern: one of its possible meanings is 'bind (join) again' . In the Christian tradition, we are told that Christ 'rose again from the dead', despite the fact that the resurrection of his body was supposedly an unique, once-off affair.

Taken together, these facts tell us something quite fundamental—that there is a natural and inevitable association between the concept of an afterlife and the enduring legacy of cyclic time. Far from being an innovation or an invention, the religious idea of rebirth, of life (light) after death (dark), is an expression of one of the oldest aspects of life on earth. Most 'higher' creatures exhibit daily circadian rhythmns (from Latin circa meaning about, die meaning day)."

 

 

LIFE LIVE A LIVE LIFE

LIFE DEATH LIFE DEATH LIFE

RESURRECTION INCARNATION RESURRECTION

 

 

Thrice-Greatest Hermes, Vol. 3: I. Excerpts by Stobæus: Commentary -
According to Reitzenstein, Kamephis or Kmephis, that is Kmeph, is equated by Egyptologists with Kneph, who, according to Plutarch, 1 was worshipped in the ... www.sacred-texts.com/gno/th3/th328.htm -

Thrice-Greatest Hermes, Vol. 3, by G.R.S. Mead, [1906], at sacred-texts.com

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COMMENTARY

ARGUMENT

1. The “Virgin of the Worldis a sacred sermon of initiation into the Hermes-lore, the first initiation, in which the tradition of the wisdom is handed on by the hierophant to the neophyte, by word of mouth. The instructor, or revealer, is the representative of Isis-Sophia, and speaks in her name, pouring forth for her beloved son, the new-born Horus, the first draught of

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immortality, which is to purge away the poison of the mortal cup of forgetfulness and ignorance, and so raise him from the “dead.”

This pouring-forth explains that the divine economy is perfect order, mystery transcending mystery,—each state of being, and each being, a mystery to those below that state.

This order no mortal intellect can ever grasp; nay, in the far-off ages, when as yet there were no men, but only Gods, those essences that know no death, the first creation of the World-creator,—even these Gods, these mysteries to us, were in amazement at the glories of the greater mysteries which decked the Heaven with their unveiled transcendent beauty. Even these Gods did not know God as yet.

2. The Gods were immortal, but unknowing; they were intoxicated with Heaven’s beauty, amazed, nay awestruck, at the splendour of the mysteries of Heaven. Then came there forth another outpouring of the Father over all; He poured the Splendour of His Mind into their hearts and they began to know. 1

With this representation is blended a mythical historical tradition which suggests that all this was brought about for an “earth” on which our humanity had not as yet appeared, in far-off distant days when apparently our earth was not as now, ages ago, the purest Golden Age when there were Gods, not men. In that race of Gods, those of them in whom the ray was no low-burning spark, but a divine flame, were the instructors in the heavenly wisdom.

3. Of these was Hermes, a race or “being” rather

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than an individual; these “Sons of Fire” left the record of their wisdom engraved on “stone” in symbol, in charge of others of the same race but less knowing than themselves; and so they ascended to Heaven.

4. Those that succeeded them had not the flame so bright within their hearts; they were of the same race, but younger souls—the Tat-race. Hermes could not hand on the direct knowledge to them, the “perfect sight” (θεωρία), and so recorded the wisdom in symbol and myth. Still later the Asclepius-race joined themselves to the Tat-souls.

All this, however, took place many many ages ago, long even before the days of the men-gods Osiris and Isis; for the real wisdom of Hermes was so ancient that even Isis herself had had to search out the hidden records, and that too by means of the inner sight, when she herself had won the power to see, and the True Sun had risen for her mind.

5. But the strain of reconstructing the history of this far-distant past, as he conceived it to have been, is too much for the writer. He knows he is dealing with “myths,” with what Plutarch would have called the “doings of the daimones;” he knows that in reality these primæval “Books” of Hermes have no longer any physical existence, if indeed they ever had any; he knows that no matter what legends are told, or whatever the general priesthood may believe about ancient physical inscriptions of the primæval Hermes,—all this has passed away, and that the real wisdom of Hermes is engraved on the tablets of the æther, and not hidden in the shrines of earth.

The “Books” are engraved in the “sacred symbols of the cosmic elements,” and hidden away hard by the “secrets of Osiris”—the mysteries of creative fire, the light that speaks in the heart. The true Books of

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[paragraph continues] Hermes are hidden away in their own zones, the pure elements of the unseen world—the celestial Egypt.

6. This wisdom was held in safe keeping for the “souls” of men; it was a soul-gnosis, not a physical knowledge. Hereupon the writer begins the recital of his tradition 1 of the creation of the “souls” of men in their unfallen state, all of which is derived from the “Books of Hermes.” The soul-creation runs as follows:

The Watchers 2 approach the Creator. The hour has struck for a new Cosmic Dawn, for a new Day. The time has come for Cosmos to awake after the Night. 3 The Creative Mind of the universe turns His attention, His thought, to a new phase of things, a new world-period.

7. God smiled, and His laughter thrilled through space, 4 and with His Word, called forth into the light the new dawn from out the primæval darkness of the new world-space. His first creation, transcendental or intelligible Nature, stood before Him, in all the marvel of her new beauty, the primal plērōma, or potential fullness, of the new universe or system, the ideal cosmos of our world, for there were many others,—the Gods who marvelled at the mystery.

Straightway this Nature fell from one into three, herself and Toil and their fairest child Invention, to

 

 

p. 138

whom God gave the gift of being, themselves producing ideal form alone.

The first creation, then, was the bringing forth of potencies and types and ideas, to whom God gave the gift of being; it was as yet the world “above,” the primæval Heaven, in ultimate perfection, thus constituting the unchanging boundaries of the new universe that was to be. These things-that-are were filled with “mysteries,” not “breaths” or “lives,” for these were not as yet.

8. The next stage is the breathing of the spiritual (not the physical) breath of lives into the fairest blend of the primal elements that condition the world-area. This blend or soul-substance is called psychōsis. The primal elements were not our mixed earth, water, fire, and air, but “knowing fire” (perhaps “fire in itself,” as Hermes elsewhere calls it, or intelligible fire, perchance the “flower of fire” of the so-called “Chaldæan Oracles” 1) and unknowing air, if we may judge from the phrase (7): “Let heaven be filled with all things full, and air and æther [? = fire] too!” It is Heaven or the ideal world that is so filled; even earth-water was not yet manifested, much less earth and water.

It seems, then, that these souls (souls corresponding above with the subsequent man-stage below) were a blend of the three: spirit, knowing fire, and unknowing air,—triads, yet a unity called psychōsis.

9. They were moreover all essentially equal, but differed according to some fixed law of numbering; they were also apparently definite in number, one soul perchance for every star, as with Plato, according to the law of similarity of less and greater, of within and without.

10. These souls, then, were “sacred (or typical) men,”

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a creation prior to that of the “sacred animals”; their habitat was in Upper Nature, the “all-fairest station of the æther”—the celestial cosmos.

11. They were appointed to certain stations and to the task of keeping the “wheel revolving,”—that is, as we shall see, they were to fashion forms for birth and death, and so provide means of transmission for the life-currents ever circulating in the great sphere. This was their appointed task, the law imposed on them, as obedient children of the Great King, their sire. So long as they kept their appointed stations they were to live for ever in surroundings of bliss and beauty, in full contemplation of the glories of the greater universe, throned amid the stars. But if they disobeyed the law, bonds and punishment await them.

12. We next come to a further creation of souls—a subject somewhat difficult to follow. These souls are of an inferior grade to the preceding, for they are composed of the primal water and earth, of “water in itself” and “earth in itself” we must suppose, and not of the compound elements we now call by these names. These are the souls of certain “sacred animals” or lives, which bear the same relationship to the souls which “keep the wheel revolving” as animals do to man on earth. They are, however, not shaped like the animals on earth, nor possess even typical animal forms, but bear the forms of men, though they are not men.

13. Still was the divine “water-earth” substance unexhausted, and so the residue was handed over to “those souls that had gone in advance and had been summoned to the land of Gods,”—that is to say, those stations near the Gods, in highest æther, of which mention has just been made. These souls are, of course, the man-souls proper.

Out of this residue these Builders were to fashion

p. 140

animals, after the models the Creator gave them,—certain types of life, below the “man” type proper, ranged in due order corresponding to the “motions of the souls.” That is to say, there were various classes of Builders according to the types of animals which were to be copied. The Builders were to fashion the forms, the Creator was to breathe into them the life.

14. Thus these Builders fashioned the etheric doubles of birds, quadrupeds, fish and reptiles, and not their physical bodies, for as yet the earth was not solid.

15. And so the Builder-souls accomplished their task, and fashioned the primæval copies of the celestial types of animals. Proud of their work, they grew restive at the restraints placed upon them by the law of their stations, and overstepped the limits decreed by the Creator. 1

Whereupon the punishment is pronounced, and the Creator resolves to make the human frame, therein to imprison the disobedient souls.

And here we learn incidentally that all of this

p. 141

psychogenesis which has gone before was the direct teaching of Hermes to the writer; of no physical Hermes, however, but of that Hermes whose “Books” are hidden in the zones (5), of the Hermes whom the writer, as he would have us believe, came to know face to face only after his inner vision was opened, and he had gazed with all-seeing eyes “upon the mysteries of that new dawn” (4).

16. For the new and mysterious fabrication of the man-form, all the seven obedient Gods, to whom the man-souls are kin (17), are summoned by the chief of them, Hermes himself, the beloved son and messenger of the Supreme, “soul of My Soul, and holy mind of My own Mind.” 1

17. All of the seven promise to bestow the best they have on man.

18. The plasm out of which the man-form is to be modelled is the residue of the mixture out of which the Builders had already made the animal doubles. But the Builder of the man-frames was Hermes himself, who mixed the plasm with still more water.

19. Here the writer inserts a further piece of information concerning the source of his tradition. It is no longer as before what Hermes himself reveals to him in vision, but what the writer was told at a certain initiation called the “Black Rite.” This rite was presided over by Kamēphis, who is called the “earliest of all,” or perhaps more correctly the “most primæval of [us] all.” Kamēphis is thus conceived as the representative of a more ancient wisdom than that of Isis, and yet even he but hands on the tradition of Hermes. 2

20. The souls are “enfleshed,” and utter loud complaints. Apparently not all at first can speak articulately; most of them can only groan, or scream,

 

p. 142

or hiss. The leading class of souls can, however, so far dominate the plasm as to speak articulately, and so one of their number utters a desperate appeal to Heaven.

21. They have now lost their celestial state, and Heaven is shut away from them; no longer can they see “without the light.” They are shut down into a “heart’s small compass”; the Sun of their being has become a light-spark only, hidden in the heart. This is, of course, the logos, the inmost reality in man.

22. The souls pray for some amelioration of their unhappy lot, and the conditions of the moral law are expounded to them. They who do rightly shall, on their body’s dissolution, reascend to Heaven and be at rest; they who do ill, shall work out their redemption under the law of metempsychosis, or change from body to body, from prison to prison.

23. Details of this metempsychosis are then given with special reference to the incarnations of the “more righteous,” who shall be kings, philosophers and prophets. Such souls apparently, for it is not expressly so stated, shall, in passing round the wheel of rebirth, when out of incarnation in a human body, have some sort of life with the souls of the leading types of animals, which are given as eagles, lions, dragons, and dolphins. Or, if we are unjustified in this speculation, such souls shall in their animal parts have intimate relation with the noblest types of animal essence (24).

25. There now comes upon the scene the mighty Intellect of the Earth, a veritable Erdgeist, in the form of Mōmus, who speaking out of affection for him (28), urges Hermes to increase ills and trials upon the souls of men, so that they shall not dare too much (25-27). And thereon Hermes sets in motion the instrument or engine of unerring fate and mechanical retribution (28, 29).

p. 143

29. Now all these things took place at the dawn of earth-life, when all as yet was inert, as far as our now solid earth is concerned. We must then suppose that as yet our present phase of existence on earth had not yet been manifested; that all was as yet in a far subtler or more primitive state of existence, when earth was still all “a-tremble,” and had not yet hardened to its present state of solidity;—that is to say, that the man-plasm was in an etheric state (30).

31. The earth gradually hardens. Into the now more solid earth, the Creator and His obedient sons, the Gods who had not made revolt, poured forth the blessings of nature. This is described by the beautiful symbol of the hands of blessing, figured in Egypt as the sun-rays, each terminating in a hand for giving light and life. 1

The imprisoned souls, the kinsmen of the Gods obedient, continue their revolt; they are the leaders of mankind, of a mankind far weaker than themselves, a humanity, apparently evolved normally from the nature of things and as yet in its childhood. Instead of teaching them the lessons of love and wisdom, the Disobedient Ones use them for evil purposes, for war and conflict, for oppression and savagery.

32. Things go from bad to worse; the earth is befouled with the horrors of savage man, until in despair the pure elements complain to God. They pray that He will send a holy emanation of Himself to set things right (32-34).

35. Hereupon God sends forth the mystery of a new birth, a divine descent, or emanation, an avatāra, as the Aryan Hindu tradition would call it, a dual manifestation. 2 And so Osiris and Isis are born to help the

 

p. 144

world, to recall men from savagery, and restore the moral order (35-37).

It was they who were taught directly by Hermes (37) in all law and science and wisdom. Their mission meets with success, and the “world” is filled with a knowledge of the Path of Return. But before their ascension into Heaven they have a petition to make to the Father, that not only earth but also the surrounding spaces up to Heaven itself may be filled with a knowledge of the truth. Thus then they proceed to hymn the Sire and Monarch of all in a praise-giving which, unfortunately, Stobæus did not think fit to copy.

 

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The original text of the “Virgin of the World” treatise is obviously broken only by the omission of the Hymn of Osiris and Isis, and Excerpt ii. follows otherwise immediately on Excerpt i. The subject is the birth of royal souls, taken up from the instruction given in K. K., 23, 24 above.

39. There are four chief spaces: (i) Invisible Heaven, inhabited by the Gods, with the Invisible Sun as lord of all; (ii) Æther, inhabited by the Stars, of which for us the Sun is leader; (iii) Air, in which dwell non-incarnate souls, ruled by the Moon, as watcher o’er the paths of genesis; (iv) Earth, inhabited by men and animals, and over men the immediate ruler is the Divine King of the time.

40. The king-soul is the last of the Gods but the first of men 1; he is, however, on earth a demigod only, for his true divinity is obscured. His soul, or ka, comes from a soul-plane superior to that of the rest of mankind.

The ascending souls of normally evolving humanity are thought of, apparently, as describing ever widening

p. 145

circles in their wheelings in and out of incarnation, rising, as they increase in virtue and knowledge, at the zenith of their ascent in the intermediate state, before they turn to descend again into rebirth, ever nearer to the limits of the sensible world and, the frontiers of Heaven.

41. But there is also another class of descending royal souls, who have only slightly transgressed, and therefore descend only as far as this grade of humanity.

42. For the royal or ruling soul is not only a warrior monarch; his sovereignty may be also shown in arts of peace. He may be a righteous judge, a musician or poet, a truth-lover or philosopher. The activities of these souls are not determined, as is the case with souls of lower grades,—that is, those souls which have fallen deeper into material existence,—by what Basilides would have called the “appendages” of the animal nature; they are determined by a fairer taxis, an escort of angels and daimones, who accompany them into birth.

43. The description of their manner of birth, however, is, unfortunately, lost to us, owing either to the hesitation of Stobæus to make it public, or to its being cut out by some subsequent copyist.

44. We are next told that sex is no essential characteristic of the soul. It is an “accident” of the body, but this body is not the physical, but the “aery” body, which air, however, is not a simple element, but already differentiated into four sub-elements. 1

45. Moreover the sight, or intelligence, of the soul also depends upon the purity of certain envelopes, which

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are called “airs,”—“airs” apparently more subtle even than the aery body (45). 1

46. Next follows a naïve reason for the excellence of Egypt and the wisdom of the Egyptians (46-48). Here the writer seems to be no longer dependent directly on the Trismegistic tradition, but is inserting and expanding popular notions.

49. The remaining sections of the Excerpt are taken up with speculations as to the cause of delirium (49, 50), and Stobæus brings his extract to a conclusion apparently without allowing the writer to complete his exposition.

SOURCES?

The discussion as to the meaning of the title, which has so far been invariably translated “The Virgin of the World,” will come more appropriately later on.

How much of the original treatise has been handed on to us by Stobæus we have no external means of deciding. Our two Extracts, however, plainly stand in immediate connection with each other, and the original text is broken only by the unfortunate omission of the Hymn of Osiris and Isis. The first Extract, moreover, is plainly not the beginning of the treatise, since it opens with words referring to what has gone before; while the second Extract ends in a very unsatisfactory manner in the middle of a subject.

What we have, however, gives us some very interesting indications of how the writer regarded his sources,—whether written or oral, whether physical or psychic. He of course would have us take his treatise as a literary unity; and indeed the subject is so worked up that it is very difficult to discover what the literary

p. 147

sources that lay before the writer may have been, for the story runs on straight enough in the same thought-mould and literary form, in spite of the insertion of somewhat contradictory statements concerning the sources of information.

When, however, Reitzenstein (p. 136) expressly states that the creation-story shows indubitable traces of two older forms, and that this is not a matter of surprise, as we find two (or more precisely four) different introductions,—we are not able entirely to follow him. It is true that these introductory statements are apparently at variance, but on further consideration they appear to be not really self-contradictory.

THE DIRECT VOICE AND THE BOOKS OF HERMES

The main representation is that the teacher of Isis is Hermes, who saw the world-creation, that is, the creation of our earth-system, and the soul-making, with his own spiritual sight (2). Isis has obtained her knowledge in two ways: either from the sacred Books of Hermes (4, 5); or by the direct spiritual voice of the Master (15). The intention here is plainly to claim the authority of direct revelation, for even the Books are not physical. They have disappeared, if indeed they ever were physical, and can only be recovered from the tablets of unseen nature, by ascending to the zones (5) where they are hidden; and these zones are plainly the same as the soul-spaces mentioned in S. I. H., 8.

At the same time there is mention of another tradition, which, though in later details purporting to be historic and physical, in its beginnings is involved in purely mythological and psychic considerations. When the first and most ancient Hermes ascended to Heaven, he left his Books in the charge of the Gods, his kinsmen,

p. 148

in the zones, and not on earth (3). On earth there succeeded to this wisdom a younger race, beloved of Hermes, and personified as his son Tat. These were souls as yet too young to understand the true science face to face. They were apparently regarded as the Tat (Thoth) priesthood of our humanity, who were subsequently joined by wisdom-lovers of another line of tradition, the Imuth (Asclepius) brotherhood, who had their doctrine originally from Ptah. 1 This seems to hint at some ancient union of two traditions or schools of mystic science, perhaps from the Memphitic and Thebaic priesthoods respectively. 2

What, however, is clear is that the writer professes to set forth a higher and more direct teaching than either the received tradition of the Isiac mystery-cult or of the Tat-Asclepius school. This he does in the person of Isis as the face to face disciple of the most ancient Hermes, 3 thus showing us that in the Hermes-circles of the Theoretics, or those who had the direct sight, though the Isis mystery-teaching was considered a tradition of the wisdom, it was nevertheless held to be entirely subordinate to the illumination of the direct sight.

 

p. 149

KAMEPHIS AND THE DARK MYSTERY

In apparent contradiction to all this we have the following statement: “Now give good heed, son Horus, for thou art being told the mystic spectacle which Kamēphis, our forefather, was privileged to hear from Hermes, the record-writer of all deeds, and I from Kamēphis when he did honour me with the Black [Rite] that gives perfection” (19). 1

Here Reitzenstein (p. 137) professes to discover the conflation of two absolutely distinct traditions of (i) Kamephis, a later god and pupil of Hermes, and (ii) Kamephis, an older god and teacher of Isis; but in this I cannot follow him. It all depends on the meaning assigned to the words παρὰ τοῦ πάντων προγενεστέρου, which Reitzenstein regards as signifying “the most ancient of all [gods],” but which I translate as “the most ancient of [us] all.”

I take it to mean simply that, according to the general Isis-tradition, the founder of its mysteries was stated to be Kamephis, but that the Isis-Hermes circles claimed that this Kamephis, though truly the most ancient figure in the Isis tradition proper, was nevertheless in his turn the pupil of the still more ancient Hermes.

The grade of Kamephis was presumably represented in the mystery-cult by the arch-hierophant who presided at the degree called the “Dark Mystery” or “Black Rite.” It was a rite performed only for those

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who were judged worthy of it (ἐτίμησεν) after long probation in lower degrees, something of a far more sacred character, apparently, than the instruction in the mysteries enacted in the light.

I would suggest, therefore, that we have here a reference to the most esoteric institution of the Isiac tradition, the more precise nature of which we will consider later on; it is enough for the moment to connect it with certain objects or shows that were apparently made to appear in the dark. As Clement of Alexandria says in his famous commonplace book, called the Stromateis 1:

“It is not without reason that in the mysteries of the Greeks, lustrations hold the first place, analogous to ablutions among the Barbarians [that is, non-Greeks]. After these come the lesser mysteries, which have some foundation of instruction and of preliminary preparation for what is to follow; and then the great mysteries, in which nothing remains to be learned of the universe, but only to contemplate and comprehend nature [herself] and the things [which are mystically shown to the initiated].” 2

 

p. 151

KNEPH-KAMEPHIS

But who was Kamēphis in the theology of the Egyptians? According to Reitzenstein, Kamephis or Kmephis, that is Kmeph, is equated by Egyptologists with Kneph, who, according to Plutarch, 1 was worshipped in the Thebaid as the ingenerable and immortal God. Kneph, however, as Sethe has shown, 2 is one of the aliases of Ammon, who is the “bull [or husband] of his mother,” the “creator who has created himself.” Kneph is, moreover, the Good Daimon, as Philo of Byblus says. 3 He is the Sun-god and Heaven-god Ammon.

“If he open his eyes, he filleth all with light in his primæval 4 land; and if he close them all is dark.” 5

Here we have Kneph-Ammon as the giver of light in darkness, and the opener of the eyes.

Moreover, Porphyry 6 tells us that the Egyptians regarded Kneph as the demiurge or creator, and represented him in the form of a man, with skin of a blue-black tint, girt with a girdle, and holding

 

 

 

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a sceptre, and wearing a crown of regal wings. This symbolism, says Porphyry, signified that he was the representative of the Logos or Reason, difficult to discover, hidden, 1 not manifest 2; it is he who gives light and also life 3; he is the King. The winged crown upon his head, he adds, signifies that he moves or energizes intellectually.

Kamephis, then, stands in the Isis-tradition for the representative of Agathodaimon, the Logos-creator. He is, however, a later holder of this office, and has had it handed on to him by Hermes, or at any rate he is instructed in the Logos-wisdom by Hermes.

HERMES I. AND HERMES II.

In this connection it is instructive to refer to the account which Syncellus 4 tells us he took from the statement of Manetho.

Manetho, says Syncellus, states in his Books, that he based his replies concerning the dynasties of Egypt to King Ptolemy on the monuments.

“[These monuments], he [Manetho] tells us, were engraved in the sacred language, and in the characters of the sacred writing, by Thoth the First Hermes; after the Flood they were translated from the sacred language into the then common tongue, but [still written] in hieroglyphic characters, and stored away in books, by the Good Daimon’s son, the Second Hermes, the father of Tat, in the inner shrines of the temples of Egypt.”

 

 

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Here we have a tradition, going back as far as Manetho, which I have shown, in Chapter V. of the “Prolegomena” on “Manetho, High Priest of Egypt,” cannot be so lightly disposed of as has been previously supposed,—dealing expressly with the Books of Hermes.

This tradition, it is true, differs from the account given in our Sermon (3-5), where the writer says nothing expressly of a flood, but evidently wishes us to believe that the most ancient records of Hermes were magically hidden in the zones of the unseen world, and that the flood, if there was one, was a flood or lapse of time that had utterly removed these records from the earth. For him they no longer existed physically.

Manetho’s account deals with another view of the matter. His tradition appears to be as follows. The oldest records were on stone monuments which had survived some great flood in Egypt. These records belonged to the period of the First Hermes, the Good Daimon par excellence, the priesthood, therefore, of the earliest antediluvian Egyptian civilization. After the flood they were translated from the most archaic language into ancient Egyptian, and preserved in book-form by the Second Hermes, the priesthood, presumably, of the most ancient civilization after the flood, who were in time succeeded by the Tat priesthood.

That this tradition is elsewhere contradicted by the Isis-tradition proper, which in a somewhat similar genealogy places Isis at the very beginning prior even to Hermes I., 1 need not detain us, since each tradition would naturally claim the priority of those whom it regarded as its own special founders, and we are for the moment concerned only with the claims of the Hermes-school.

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The main point of interest is that there was a tradition which explained the past on the hypothesis of periods of culture succeeding one another,—the oldest being supposed to have been the wisest and highest; the most archaic hieroglyphic language, which perhaps the priests of Manetho’s day could no longer fully understand, 1 was supposed to have been the tongue of the civilization before the Flood of Hermes I. It may even be that the remains of this tongue were preserved only in the magical invocations, as a thing most sacred, the “language of the gods.”

The point of view, however, of the circle to which our writer belonged, was that the records of this most ancient civilization were no longer to be read even in the oldest inscriptions; they could only be recovered by spiritual sight. Into close relation with this, we must, I think, bring the statement made in § 37, that Osiris and Isis, though they themselves had learned all the secrets of the records of Hermes, nevertheless kept part of them secret, and engraved on stone only such as were adapted for the intelligence of “mortal men.”

The Kamephis of the Isis-tradition, then, apparently stands for Kneph as Agathodaimon, that is for Hermes, but not for our Hermes I., 2 for he has no physical

 

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contact with the Isis-tradition, but for Hermes II., who was taught by Hermes I.

THE BLACK RITE

But what is the precise meaning of the “black rite” at which Kamephis presides? I have already suggested the environment in which the general meaning may be sought, though I have not been able to produce any objective evidence of a precise nature. Reitzenstein (pp. 139 ff.), however, thinks he has discovered that evidence. His view is as follows:

The key to the meaning, according to him, is to be found in the following line from a Magic Papyrus 1:

“I invoke thee, Lady Isis, with whom the Good Daimon doth unite, 2 He who is Lord ἐν τῷ τελείῳ μέλανι.”

Reitzenstein thinks that the Good Daimon here stands for Chnum, and works out (p. 140) a learned hypothesis that the “black” refers to a certain territory of black earth, between Syene and Takompso, the Dedocaschœnus, especially famed for its pottery, which was originally in the possession of the Isis priesthood, but was subsequently transferred to the priesthood of Chnum by King Dośer. Reitzenstein would thus, presumably, translate the latter half of the sentence as “the Good Daimon who is Lord in the perfect black [country],” and so make it refer to Chnum, though indeed he seems himself to feel the inadequacy of this explanation to cover the word “perfect” (p. 144). But this seems to me to take all the dignified meaning out of both our text and that of the Magic Papyrus, and to introduce

 

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local geographical considerations which are plainly out of keeping with the context.

It is far more natural to make the Agathodaimon of the Papyrus refer to Osiris; for indeed it is one of his most frequent designations. Moreover, it is precisely Osiris who is pre-eminently connected with the so-called “under world,” the unseen world, the “mysterious dark.” He is lord there, while Isis remains on earth; it is he who would most fitly give instructions on such matters, and indeed one of the ancient mystery-sayings was precisely, “Osiris is a dark God.” 1

“He who is Lord in the perfecting black,” might thus mean that Osiris, the masculine potency 2 of the soul, purified and perfected the man on the mysterious dark side of things, and completed the work which Isis, the feminine potency of the soul, had begun on him.

That, in the highest mystery-circles, this was some stage of union of the man with the higher part of himself, may be deduced from the interesting citations made by Reitzenstein (pp. 142-144) from the later Alchemical Hermes-literature; it clearly refers to the mystic “sacred marriage,” 3 the intimate union of the soul with the logos, or divine ray. Much could be written on this subject, but it will be sufficient to append two passages of more than ordinary interest. The Jewish over-writer of the Naassene Document contends that the chief mystery of the Gnosis was but the consummation of the instruction given in the various mystery-institutions of the nations. The

 

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[paragraph continues] Lesser Mysteries, he tells us, commenting on the text of the Pagan commentator, pertained to “fleshly generation,” whereas the Greater dealt with the new birth, or second birth, with regeneration, and not with genesis. And speaking of a certain mystery, he says:

“For this is the Gate of Heaven, and this is the House of God, where the Good God 1 dwells alone, into which [House] no impure [man] shall come; but it is kept under watch for the spiritual alone; where when they come they must cast away their garments, and all become bridegrooms obtaining their true manhood through the Virginal Spirit. For such a man is the Virgin big with child, conceiving and bearing a Son, not psychic, not fleshly, but a blessed Æon of Æons.” 2

In the marvellous mystery-ritual of the new-found fragments of The Acts of John, lately discovered in a fourteenth century MS. in Vienna, disguised in hymn form, and hiding an almost inexhaustible mine of very early tradition, the “sacred marriage” is plainly suggested as one of the keys to part of the ritual. Compare, for instance, with the “casting away of their garments,” in the above-quoted passage of the Naassene writer, the following:

“[The Disciple.] I would flee.

[The Master.] I would [have thee] stay.

[The Assistants.] Amen!

[The Disciple.] I would be robed.

[The Master.] And I would robe [thee].

[The Assistants.] Amen!

[The Disciple.] I would be at-oned.

 

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[The Master.] And I would at-one.

[The Assistants.] Amen!” 1

BLACK LAND.

But to return to the “mysterious black.” Plutarch tells us: “Moreover, they [the Egyptians] call Egypt, inasmuch as its soil is particularly black, as though it were the black of the eye, Chemia, and compare it with the heart,” 2—for, he adds, it is hot and moist, and set in the southern part of the inhabitable world, in the same way as the heart in the left side of a man. 3

Egypt, the “sacred land” par excellence, was called Chemia or Chem (Ḥem), Black-land, because of the nature of its dark loamy soil; it was, moreover, in symbolic phraseology the black of the eye, that is, the pupil of the earth-eye, the stars and planets being regarded as the eyes of the gods. 4 Egypt, then, was the eye and heart of the Earth; the Heavenly Nile poured its light-flood of wisdom through this dark of the eye, or made the land throb like a heart with the celestial life-currents.

Nor is the above quotation an unsupported statement of Plutarch’s, for in an ancient text from Edfu, 5 we read: “Egypt (lit. the Black), which is so called after the eye of Osiris, for it is his pupil.”

Ammon-Kneph, too, as we have seen, is black, or blue-black, signifying his hidden and mysterious

 

 

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character; and in the above-quoted passage he is called “he who holds himself hidden in his eye,” or “he who veils himself in his pupil.”

This pupil, then, concludes Reitzenstein (p. 145), is the “mysterious black.” Is this, then, the origin of this peculiar phrase? If so, it would be connected with seeing, the spiritual sight, the true Epopteia.

THE PUPIL OF THE WORLD’S EYE

But Isis, also, is the black earth, and, therefore, the pupil of the eye of Osiris, and, therefore, also of the Chnum or Ammon identified with Osiris at Syene. Isis, therefore, herself is the “Pupil of the World’s Eye”—the κόρη κόσμου. 1

Reitzenstein would, therefore, have it that the original type of our treatise looks back to a tradition which makes the mystery-goddess Isis the disciple and spouse of the mysterious Chnum or Ammon, or Kneph or Kamephis, as Agathodaimon; and, therefore, presumably, that the making of this Kamephis the disciple in his turn of Hermes is a later development of the tradition, when the Hermes-communities gained ascendancy in certain circles of the Isis-tradition.

This is very probable; but dare we, with Reitzenstein, cast aside the “traditional” translation of κόρη κόσμου, as “Virgin of the World,” and prefix to our treatise as title the new version, “The Pupil of the Eye of the World”? It certainly sounds strange as a title to unaccustomed ears, and differs widely from any other titles of the Hermetic sermons known to us. But what does the “Virgin of the World” mean in connection with our treatise? Isis as the Virgin Mother is a

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familiar idea to students of Egyptology 1; she is κατ᾽ ἐξοχὴν, the “World-Virgin.”

THE SON OF THE VIRGIN

And here it will be of interest to turn to a curious statement of Epiphanius 2; it is missing in all editions of this Father prior to that of Dindorf (Leipzig, 1859), which was based on the very early (tenth century) Codex Marcianus 125, all previous editions being printed from a severely censured and bowdlerized fourteenth century MS.

Epiphanius is stating that the true birthday of the Christ is the Feast of Epiphany, “at a distance of thirteen days from the increase of the light [i.e. December 25]; for it needs must have been that this should be a figure of our Lord Jesus Christ Himself and of His twelve disciples, who make up the thirteen days of the increase of the Light.” The Feast of the Epiphany was a great day in Egypt, connected with the “Birth of the Æon,”—a phase of the “Birth of Horus.” For Epiphanius thus continues:

“How many other things in the past and present support and bear witness to this proposition, I mean the birth of Christ! Indeed, the leaders of the idol-cults, 3 filled with wiles to deceive the idol-worshippers who believe in them, in many places keep highest festival on this same night of Epiphany [= the Manifestation to Light], so that they whose hopes are in error may not seek the truth. For instance, at

 

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[paragraph continues] Alexandria, in the Koreion, 1 as it is called—an immense temple, that is to say the Precinct of the Virgin—after they have kept all-night vigil with songs and music, chanting to their idol, when the vigil is over, at cock-crow, they descend with lights into an underground crypt, and carry up a wooden image lying naked on a litter, with the seal of a cross made in gold on its forehead, and on either hand two similar seals, and on either knee two others, all five seals being similarly made in gold. And they carry round the image itself, circumambulating seven times the innermost temple, to the accompaniment of pipes, tabors and hymns, and with merry-making they carry it down again underground. And if they are asked the meaning of this mystery, they answer: ‘To-day at this hour the Maiden (Korē), that is, the Virgin, gave birth to the Æon.’”

He further adds that at Petra, in Arabia, where, among other places, this mystery was also performed, the Son of the Virgin is called by a name meaning the “Alone-begotten of the Lord.” 2

Here, then, at Alexandria, in every probability the very environment of our treatise, we have a famous mystery-rite, solemnized in the Temple of the Virgin, who gives birth to a Son, the Æon. This, we shall not be rash in assuming, signifies not only the birth of the new year, but also still more profound mysteries, when we remember the words of the Naassene Document quoted above: “For such a man is the Virgin, big with child, conceiving and bearing a Son,—not psychic, not fleshly [nor, we may add, temporal], but

 

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a blessed Æon of Æons”—that is, an Eternity of Eternities, an immortal God.

We should also notice the crowing of the cock, which plays so important a part in the crucifixion-story in the Gospels, 1 and above all things the stigmata on the image, the symbols of a cosmic and human mystery.

THE MYSTERY OF THE BIRTH OF HORUS

In our own treatise the mysterious Birth of Horus is also referred to (35, 36) as follows.

Isis has handed on the tradition of the Coming of Osiris, the Divine emanation, the descent of the efflux of the Supreme, and Horus asks: “How was it, mother, then, that Earth received God’s efflux?”—where Earth may well refer to the “Dark Earth,” a synonym of Isis herself.

And Isis answers: “I may not tell the story of [this] birth; for it is not permitted to describe the origin of this descent, O Horus, [son] of mighty power, lest afterward the way of birth of the immortal Gods should be known unto men.”

Here I think we have a clear reference to the mysterious “Birth of Horus,” the birth of the gods,—that is to say, of how a man becomes a god, becomes the most royal of all souls, gains the kingdom, or lordship over himself. This mystery was not yet to be revealed to the neophyte—Horus—and yet this Birth is suggested to Tat by Hermes—C. H., xiii. (xiv.) 2—when he says: “Wisdom that understands in silence [such is the matter and the womb from out which Man is born] and the True Good the Seed.”

The womb is the mysterious Silence, the matter is

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[paragraph continues] Wisdom, Isis herself, the seed is the Good, the Agathodaimon, Osiris.

But in our treatise Horus has not yet reached to this high state; Isis, as the introductory words tell us, is pouring forth for him “the first draught of immortality” only, “which souls have custom to receive from gods”; he is being raised to the understanding of a daimon, but not as yet to that of a god.

All of this, moreover, seems to have been part and parcel of the Isis mystery-tradition proper, for as Diodorus (i. 25), following Hecatæus, informs us, it was Isis who “discovered the philtre of immortality, by means of which, when her son Horus, who had been plotted against by the Titans, and found dead (νεκρόν) beneath the water, not only raised him to life (ἀναστῆσαι) by giving him life (ψυχήν), but also made him sharer in immortality.”

Here we have evidence to show that in the mystery-myth Horus was regarded as the human soul, and that there were two interpretations of the mystery. It referred not only to the “rising from the dead” in another body, or return to life in another enfleshment, but also to a still higher mystery, whereby the consciousness of immortality was restored to the memory of the soul. The soul had been cast by the Titans, or the opposing powers of the subtle universe, into the deep waters of the Great Sea, the Ocean of Generation, or Celestial Nile, for as the mysterious informant of Cleombrotus told him, 1 these stories of Titans concerned daimons or souls proper, not bodies. 2

 

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From this death in the sea of matter, Isis, the Mother Soul, brings Horus repeatedly back to life, and finally bestows on him the knowledge of immortality, and so raises him from the “dead.” 1

This birth of the “true man” within, the logos, was and is for man the chief of all mysteries. In the Chapter on “The Popular Theurgic Hermes-Cult,” we have already, in elucidation of the sacramental formula, “Thou art I and I am thou,” quoted the agraphon from the Gospel of Eve concerning the Great Man and the Little Man or Dwarf, and lovers of the Aupaniṣhad literature of Hindu-Aryan theosophy need hardly be

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reminded of “the ‘man,’ of the size of a thumb,” within, in the ether of the heart. 1

“ISHON”

But what is of more immediate interest is that the same idea is to some extent found in the Old Covenant documents, especially in the Prophetical and Wisdom literature, which latter was strongly influenced by Hellenistic ideas.

Ishon, which literally means “little man” or “dwarf,” 2 is in A.V. generally translated “apple of the eye.” 3

Thus we read in a purely literal sense, referring to weeping: “Let not the apple of thine eye cease” (Lam. ii. 18).

It was, however, a common persuasion, that the intelligence or soul itself, not merely the reflection of the image of another person, resided in the eye, and was made manifest chiefly by the eye.

Thus the “apple of the eye” was used as a synonym for a man’s most precious possession, the treasure-house as it were of the light of a man.

 

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And so we read: “He [Yahweh] kept him [Israel] as the apple of his eye” (Ps. xvii. 8)—where ishon is in the Hebrew further glossed as the “daughter of the eye”; and again: “Thus saith the Lord of Hosts: . . . He that toucheth you toucheth the apple of his eye” (Zech. ii. 8).

The “apple of the eye” (ishon) was, then, something of great value, something very precious, and, therefore, we read in the Wisdom-literature that the punishment of the man who curses his father and mother is that “his lamp shall be put out in obscure (ishon) darkness” (Prov. xx. 20)—that is, that he shall thus extinguish the lamp of his intelligence, or perhaps spiritual nature, “in the apple of his eye there will be darkness”; and this connects with a passage in the Psalms which shows traces of the same Wisdom-teaching. “In the hidden part 1 [of man] thou shalt make me to know wisdom” (Ps. li. 6).

But the most striking passages are to be found in that pre-eminently Wisdom-chapter in the Proverbs-collection, where the true Israelite is warned to remain faithful to the Law (Torah), and to have no commerce with the “strange woman,” the “harlot”—that is, the “false doctrines” of the Gentiles. 2

“Keep my law as the apple of thine eye” (Prov. vii. 2), says the writer, speaking in the name of Yahweh, for he has seen the young and foolish being led astray by the “strange woman.” “He went the way to her house, in the twilight, in the evening; in the black (ishon) and dark night” (Prov. vii. 9). That is to say,

 

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his lamp was put out; there was dark night in his eye, in that little man of his, which should be his true light-spark understanding the wisdom of Yahweh.

Here, I think, we have additional evidence, that the idea, that the pupil of the eye was the seat of the spiritual intelligence in man, was widespread in Hellenistic circles. 1 But even so, can we translate κόρη κόσμου as the “Apple of the World-Eye”? It is true that Isis is the instrument or organ of conveying the hidden wisdom to Horus, and that it is eventually Hermes or the Logos who is the true light itself, which shines through her, the pupil of Egypt’s eye, 2 out of that mysterious darkness, in which she found herself, when she received illumination at the hands of Kamephis; but is this sufficient justification for rejecting the traditional translation of the title, and adopting a new version?

On the whole I am inclined to think, that though the new rendering may at first sight appear somewhat strained, nevertheless in proportion as we become more familiarized with the idea and remember the thought-environment of the time, we may venture so to translate it. Isis, then, is the “Apple or Pupil of the Eye of Osiris.” On earth the “mysterious black” is Egypt

 

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herself, the wisdom-land. Isis is the mysterious wisdom of Egypt, but in our treatise she is even more than this, for she is that wisdom but now truly illumined by the direct sight, the new dawn of the Trismegistic discipline of which she speaks (4).

To a Greek, however, the word κόρη would combine and not distinguish the two meanings of the title over which we have been labouring; but even as logos meant both “word” and “reason,” so korē would mean both “virgin” and “pupil of the eye”; but as it is impossible to translate it in English by one word, we have followed the traditional rendering.

THE SIXTY SOUL-REGIONS

We now turn to a few of the most important points which require more detailed treatment than the space of a footnote can accommodate. There are, of course, many other points that could be elaborated, but if that were done, the present work would run into volumes.

The number of degrees into which the soul-stuff (psychōsis) is divided, is given as three, and as sixty (10). If this statement stood by itself we should have been somewhat considerably puzzled to have known what to make of it, even when we remembered the mystic statement that 60 is par excellence the number of the soul, and that he who can unriddle the enigma will know its nature.

Fortunately, however, if we turn to S. I. H., 6 (Ex. xxvii.), we find that according to this tradition the soul-regions also were divided into 60 spaces, presumably corresponding to the types of souls.

They were in 4 main divisions and 60 special spaces, with no overlapping (7). These spaces were also called zones, firmaments or layers.

We are further told (6) that the lowest division, that

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is the one nearest to the earth, consists of 4 spaces; the second, of 8; the third, of 16; and the fourth, of 32.

And still further (7), that there were besides the 4 main divisions 12 intervallic ones. This introduces an element of uncertainty, for, as far as I am aware, we have no objective information which can enable us to determine how the intervallic divisions were located in the mind of the writer; speculation is rash, but a scheme has suggested itself to me, and I append it with all reservation.

First of all we have 4 main divisions or planes, separated from one another by 3 determinations of some sort, for the whole ordering pertains to the Air proper, and perhaps the 4 states of Air were regarded as earthy, watery, aery, and fiery Air. The 3 determinations may perhaps have been regarded as corresponding to the three main grades or florescences of the soul-stuff, which were apparently of a superior substance.

Each division of the 4 may further have been regarded as divided off by three intervallic determinations; so that we should have 3 such intervals in the lowest division, subdividing it into 4 spaces of 1 space each; 3 in the second, subdividing it into 4 spaces of 2 spaces each; 3 in the third, subdividing it into 4 spaces of 4 spaces each; and 3 in the fourth, subdividing it into 4 spaces of 8 spaces each. The sum of these intervals would thus be 12.

PLUTARCH’S YOGIN

In this connection, however, I cannot refrain from appending a pleasant story told by Plutarch. 1

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The speaker is Cleombrotus, a Lacedæmonian gentleman and man of means, who was a great traveller, and a greedy collector of information of all sorts to form the basis of a philosophical religion. He had spent much time in Egypt, and had also been a voyage beyond the Red Sea. On his travels Cleombrotus had heard of a philosopher-recluse, who lived in complete retirement, except once a year when he was seen by “the folk round the Red Sea”; then it was that a certain divine inspiration came upon him, and he came forth and “prophesied” to the nobles and royal scribes who used to flock to hear him. With great difficulty, and only after the expenditure of much money, Cleombrotus discovered the hermitage of this recluse, and was granted a courteous reception.

Our old philosopher was the handsomest man Cleombrotus had ever met, deeply versed in the knowledge of plants, and a great linguist. With Cleombrotus, however, he spoke Doric, and almost in verse, and “as he spake perfume filled the place from the sweetness of his breath.”

His knowledge of the various mystery-cults was profound, and his intimate acquaintance with the unseen world remarkable; he explained many things to Cleombrotus, and especially the nature of the daimones, and the important part they played as factors in any satisfactory interpretation of ancient mythology, seeing that most of the great myths referred to the doings of the daimones and not of mortals.

Cleombrotus, however, has told his story merely as an introduction to the quotation of a scrap of information let fall by the old philosopher concerning the plurality of worlds 1; thus, then, he continues:

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“THE PLAIN OF TRUTH”

“He told me that the number of worlds was neither infinite, nor one, nor five, but that there were 183 of them, arranged in the figure of a triangle of which each side contained 60, and of the remaining 3 one set at each angle. And those on the sides touch each other, revolving steadily as in a choral dance. And the area of the triangle is the Common Hearth of all, and is called the ‘Plain of Truth,’ 1 in which the logoi and ideas and paradigms of all things which have been, and which shall be, lie immovable; and the Æon [or Eternity] being round them [sc. the ideas], time flows down upon the worlds like a stream. And the sight and contemplation (θέαν) of these things is possible for the souls of men only once in ten thousand years, should they have lived a virtuous life. And the highest of our initiations here below is only the dream of that true vision and initiation 2; and the discourses [sc. delivered in the mystic rites] have been carefully devised to awaken the memory of the sublime things above, or else are to no purpose.”

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This statement I am inclined to regard as one of the most distinct pronouncements on the nature of the higher mysteries which has been preserved to us from antiquity, and the locus classicus and point of departure for any really fruitful discussion of the true nature of the philosophic mysteries, and yet I have never seen it referred to in this connection.

Our old philosopher was well acquainted with the Egyptian mystery-tradition, for Cleombrotus obtained information from him concerning the esoteric significance of Typhon and Osiris, and what I have quoted above falls naturally into place in the scheme of ideas of the tradition preserved in the treatise which we are discussing. 1 It, indeed, pertains to a higher side of the matter, for it purports to be the highest theoria of all, and possible for the souls even of the most righteous only at long periods of time.

Of course the representation is symbolical. The triangle is no triangle; it is the “plain of truth,” the “hearth of the universe.” The triangle, then, pertained to the plane of Fire proper and not Air. Still, the ordering of the “worlds” is similar to that of our soul spaces. The triangle is shut off from the manifested world by the Æon; it is out of space and time proper. Time flows down from it. The worlds proper are 3 worlds or cosmoi, each divided into 60 subordinate cosmoi, in choral dance, or orderly harmonious movement of one to the other. Our soul-spaces, then, may have been regarded as some reflection of these supernal conditions.

One is almost tempted to turn the plane triangle

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into a solid figure, a tetrahedron, 1 and imagine the idea of a world or wheel, at each of the four angles, and to speculate on the Wheels of Ezekiel, the prototype of the Mercabah or Heavenly Chariot of Kabalism, the Throne of Truth of the Supreme, but I will not try the patience of my readers any further, for doubtless most of them will have cried already: Hold, enough!

THE BOUNDARIES OF THE NUMBERS WHICH PREEXIST IN THE SOUL

Perhaps, however, it would be as well, before dismissing the subject, to consider very briefly what Plato, following Pythagoras, 2 has to say concerning the “boundaries” of all numbers which pre-exist in the soul. These soul-numbers are 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 27 (the combination of the two Pythagorean series 1, 2, 4, 8 and 1, 3, 9, 27), or 1, 2, 3, 2², 2³, 3², 3³. Of these numbers 1, 2, 3 are apportioned to the World-Soul itself, in its intellectual or spiritual aspect, and signify its abiding in (1), its proceeding from (2), and its returning to itself (3); this with regard to primary natures. But in addition, intermediate subtle natures or souls are “providentially” ordered in their evolution and involution, by the World-Soul; they proceed according to the power of the fourth term (4 or 2²), “which possesses generative powers,” and return according to that of the fifth (9 or 3²), “which reduces them to one.” Finally also solid or gross natures are also “providentially” ordered in their procession according to 8 (2³), and in their conversion according to 27 (3³). 3

 

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From all of which we get the following scheme of circular progression and conversion of the soul, the various main stages through which it passes:

 

With this compare the “Chaldæan Oracle” (ap. Psellus, 19): “Do not soil the spirit, nor turn the plane into the solid”—μὴ πνεῦμα μολύνῃς μῦτε βαθύνῃς τὸ ἐπίπεδον (ed. Cory, Or. clii., p. 270); where the four stages correspond to the point, line, plane, and solid. It is also to be remembered that since x0 = 1, 20 = 1 and 30 = l.

That these are the boundary numbers of the soul, according to Pythagoreo-Platonic tradition, is of interest, but how this can in any way be made to agree with the ordering of the soul-spaces in our treatise is a puzzle. That by adding these numbers together (1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 8 + 9 + 27) we get 54, and by farther adding the numbers of the World-Soul proper (1 + 2 + 3) we get 6, and so total out the whole sum of the phases to 60, savours somewhat of “fudging,” as we used to call it at school. It is by no means convincing, for we are here combining particulars with universals as though they were of equal dignity; still the ancients frequently resort to such combinations.

That, however, there is something more than learned trifling in these numbers of Plato may be seen by the brilliant study of Adam on the “nuptial number” of Plato, 1 which was based upon the properties of the

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[paragraph continues] “Pythagorean triangle,” a right-angled triangle to the containing sides of which the values of 3 and 4 were given, the value of its hypothenuse being consequently 5; and 3 × 4 × 5 = 60. The numbers 3, 4, 5, together with the series 1, 2, 4, 8, and 1, 3, 9, 27, were the numerical sequences which supplied those “canons of proportion” with which the Pythagoreans and Platonists chiefly busied themselves.

Still, as far as I can see, this does not throw any clear light on the ordering of the soul spaces as given in our treatise, and we are therefore tempted to connect it with the tradition of the mysterious 60’s of Cleombrotus. But what that choral dance was which ordered the subordinate cosmoi into 60’s, and whether they proceeded by stages which might correspond to 3’s and 4’s and 5’s, we have, as far as I am aware, no data on which to base an argument. It may, however, have been connected with Babylonian ideas; the 3 may have been regarded as “falling into” 4, so making 12, and this stage in its turn have been regarded as “falling into” 5, and so making 60.

THE MYSTERIOUS CYLINDER

It is to be noticed, however, that before the souls revolted, the Demiurge “appointed for them limits and reservations 1 in the height of Upper Nature, that they might keep the cylinder a-whirl in proper order and economy” (11).

They were, then, confined to certain orderings and spaces. But what is the mysterious “cylinder” which they were to keep revolving?

So far I have come across nothing that throws any

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direct light on the subject. However, Proclus 1 says that Porphyry stated that among the Egyptians the letter χ, surrounded by a circle, symbolized the mundane soul.

It is curious that Porphyry should have referred this idea to the Egyptians, when he must have known that Plato, to whom Porphyry looked as the corypheus of all philosophy, had treated of the significance of the symbol X (in Greek χ) in perhaps the most discussed passage of the Timæus (36B). 2 This letter symbolized the mutual relation of the axes and equators of the sphere of the “same” (the “fixed stars”) and the sphere of the “other” (the “seven planetary spheres”). Porphyry, however, may have believed that Plato, or Pythagoras, got the idea in the first place from Egypt—the common persuasion of his school.

This enigma of Plato is described as follows by Jowett in his Introduction to the Timæus 3:

“The universe revolves round a centre once in twenty-four hours, but the orbits of the fixed stars take a different direction from that of the planets. The outer and the inner sphere cross one another and meet again at a point opposite to that of their first contact; the first moving in a circle from left to right along the side of a parallelogram which is supposed to be inscribed in it, the second also moving in a circle along the diagonal of the same parallelogram from right to left 4; or, in

 

 

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other words, the first describing the path of the equator, the second, the path of the ecliptic.”

We should thus, just as the Egyptians, according to Porphyry, symbolized it, represent the conception by the figure of a circle with two diameters suggesting respectively the equator and the ecliptic.

But what is the rectangular figure to which Jowett refers, but which he does not further describe? The circles are spheres; and, therefore, the rectangular figure must be a solid figure inscribed in the sphere “of the same.” If we now set the circle revolving parallel to the longer sides of the figure, this “parallelogram” will trace out a cylinder, while the seven spheres of the “other,” the “souls” of the “planets,” moving parallel to one of the diagonals of our figure, and in an opposite direction to the sphere of the “same,” will, by their mutual difference of rates of motion, cause their “bodies” (the souls surrounding the bodies) to trace out spiral orbits.

All this in itself, I confess, seems very far-fetched, and I should have thrown my notes on the subject into the waste-paper basket, but for the following consideration:

Basil of Cæsarea, in his Hexæmeron, or Homilies on

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the Six Days of Creation, declared it “a matter of no interest to us whether the earth is a sphere or a cylinder or a disk, or concave in the middle like a fan.” 1

The cylinder-idea, then, was a favourite theory with regard to the earth-shape in the time of Basil, that is the fourth century.

This cylinder-idea, however, I am inclined to think was very ancient. In the domain of Greek speculation we first meet with it in what little is known of the system of Anaximander of Miletus, the successor of Thales.

Anaximander is reported to have believed that “the earth is a heavenly body, controlled by no other power, and keeping its position because it is the same distance from all things; the form of it is curved, cylindrical, like a stone column; it has two faces; one of these is the ground beneath our feet, and the other is opposite to it.” 2

And again: “That the earth is a cylinder in form, and that its depth is one-third of its breadth.” 3

Now I have never been able to persuade myself that the earliest philosophers of Greece “invented” the ideas ascribed to them. They stood on the borderland of mythology and mysticism, and, in every probability, took their ideas from ancient traditions.

 

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[paragraph continues] Anaximander himself was in every probability indirectly, for all we know even directly, influenced by Egyptian and Chaldæan notions; indeed, who can any longer doubt in the light of the Cnossus excavations?” 1

Anaximander is thus said to have regarded the earth-cylinder as fixed, whereas in our treatise the cylinder is not the earth and is not fixed; it is, on the contrary, a celestial cylinder and in constant motion. Can it, then, possibly be that this cylinder notion was associated with some Babylonian idea, and had its source in that country par excellence of cylinders? In Babylonia, moreover, the cylinder-shape was frequently used for seals, fashioned like a small roller, so that the characters or symbols engraved on them could be impressed on soft substance, such as wax. Further, the Babylonian and Egyptian civilizations were, as we know, closely associated, and pre-eminently so in the matter of sigils and seals. In the Coptic-Gnostic works, translated from Greek originals, and indubitably mainly of Egyptian origin, the idea of “characters,” “seals,” and “sigils,” as types impressed on matter, is a commonplace.

Can our cylinder, then, have some connection with the circle of animal types, or types of life, of which so much is said in our treatise? The souls of the supernal man class would then have had the task of keeping this cylinder in motion, so that thereby the various types were continually impressed on the plasms in the sphere of generation, or ever-becoming—the wheel of genesis?

This may be so, for in P. S. A., 19, we read: “The air, moreover, is the engine, or machine, through which

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all things are made . . . mortal from mortal things and things like these.”

So also in K. K., 28, Hermes says: “And I will skillfully devise an instrument, mysterious, possessed of power of sight that cannot err . . . an instrument that binds together all that’s done.”

Here again we have the same idea, all connected with the notion of Fate or Heimarmene; the instrument of Hermes is the Kārmic Wheel, by which cause and effect are linked together, and that too with a moral purpose. 1

Finally, in connection with our cylinder, we may compare the Âryan Hindu myth of the “Churning of the Ocean,” in the Viṣhṇu Purāṇa. The churning-staff or Pillar was the heaven-mountain, round which was coiled the cosmic serpent, to serve as rope for twirling it. The rope was held at either end by the Devas and Asuras, or gods and dæmons. There is also a mystic symbol in India which probably connects with a similar range of ideas. It is two superimposed triangles (⧖), with their apices touching, and round the centre a serpent is twined,—a somewhat curious resemblance to our X and cylinder-idea. And so much for this puzzling symbol.

THE EAGLE, LION, DRAGON AND DOLPHIN

We now pass to the four leading types of animals, connected with souls of the highest rank—namely, the eagle, lion, dragon, and dolphin (24, 25)—which it may be of interest to compare with the symbolism of some of the degrees of the Mithriac Mysteries. 2

 

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[paragraph continues] In one of the preliminary degrees of the rite, we are informed, some of the mystæ imitated the voices of birds, others the roaring of lions. 1 All of this was interpreted by the initiates as having reference to transmigration or metempsychosis. Thus Porphyry 2 tells us that in the Mysteries of Mithras they called the mystæ by the names of different animals, so symbolizing man’s common lower nature with that of the irrational animals. Thus, for instance, they called some of the men “lions,” and some of the women “lionesses,” some were called “ravens,” while the “fathers,” the highest grade, were called “hawks” and “eagles.” The “ravens” were the lowest grade; those of the “lion” grade were apparently previously invested with the disguises and masks of a series of animal forms before they received the lion shape.

Porphyry tells us, further, that Pallas, who had, prior to Porphyry’s day, written an excellent treatise on the Mithriaca, now unfortunately lost, asserts that all this was vulgarly believed to refer to the zodiac, but that in truth it symbolized a mystery of the human soul, which is invested with animal natures of various kinds, 3

 

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according to the tradition of the Magi. Thus they call the sun (and therefore those corresponding to this nature) a bull, a lion, a dragon, and a hawk.

It is further to be remembered that Appuleius, 1 in describing the robe with which he was invested after his initiation into the Mysteries of Isis, tells us that he was enthroned as the sun, robed in twelve sacramental stoles or garments; these garments were of linen with beautiful paintings upon them, so that from every side “you might see that I was remarkable by the animals which were painted round my vestment in various colours.” This dress, he says, was called the “Olympic Stole.”

MOMUS

Finally, it may perhaps be of service to make the reader a little better acquainted with Momus.

Among the Greeks Momus was the personification of the spirit of fault-finding. Hesiod, in his Theogony (214), places him among the second generation of the children of Night, together with the Fates. From the Cypria 2 of Stasimus, 3 we learn that, when Zeus, in answer to Earth’s prayer to relieve her of her overpopulation of impious mankind, 4 first sent the Theban War, and on this proving insufficient, bethought him of annihilating the human race by thunderbolts (fire) and floods (water), Momus advises the Father of gods and men to marry the goddess Thetis to a mortal, so that a beautiful daughter (Aphrodite-Helen) might be born to

 

 

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them, and so mankind, Greeks and Barbarians, on her account be involved in internecine strife—namely, the Trojan War. Further, the Scholiast on Il., i. 5, avers that it was Momus whom Homer meant to represent by the “will” or “counsel” of Zeus.

Sophocles, moreover, wrote a Satyric drama called “Momus,” 1 and so also Achæus. 2

Both Plato 3 and Aristotle 4 refer to Momus. Callimachus, the chief librarian of the Alexandrian Library, from 260-240 B.C., in his Ætia, 5 pilloried his critic and former pupil Apollonius Rhodius as Momus.

Momus, moreover, was a favourite figure with the Sophists and Rhetoricians, especially of the second century A.D. In Æl. Aristides, 6 Momus, as he could find no fault with Aphrodite herself, found fault with her shoe. 7 Lucian makes Aphrodite vow to oppose Momus tooth and nail, 8 and makes Momus find fault with even the greatest works of the gods, such as the house of Athene, the bull of Zeus, and the men of Hephæstus,—the last because the god-smith had not put windows in their breasts so that their hearts might be seen. 9

And, interestingly enough in connection with our treatise, Lucian, in one of his witty sketches, 10 makes

 

 

 

 

 

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[paragraph continues] Momus one of the persons of the dialogue with Zeus and Hermes. Momus finds fault because Bacchus is reckoned among the gods, and is commanded by Zeus to refrain from making ridicule of Hercules and Asclepius.

The popular figure of Momus was that of a feeble old man, 1—a very different representation from the grandiose Intelligence of our treatise, a true Lucifer.

Some representations give his one sharp tooth, and others wings. The story runs that Zeus finally banished him from Olympus for his fault-finding. 2

The Onomastica Vaticana 3 connects Momus with Mammon; but this side-issue need not detain us. 4

THE MYSTIC GEOGRAPHY OF SACRED LANDS

With regard to the symbolic figure of the Earth of §§ 46-48 of the second K. K. Extract, and the persuasion that Egypt was the heart or centre thereof, we may append two quotations on the subject from widely different standpoints. The first is from Dr Andrew D. White’s recent volumes 5:

“Every great people of antiquity, as a rule, regarded its own central city or most holy place as necessarily the centre of the earth.

“The Chaldeans held that their ‘holy house of the gods’ was the centre. The Egyptians sketched the world under the form of a human figure, in which Egypt was the heart, and the centre of it Thebes. For the Assyrians, it was Babylon; for the Hindus, it was Mount Meru; for the Greeks, so far as the civilized

 

 

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world was concerned, Olympus or the temple of Delphi; for the modern Mohammedans, it is Mecca and its sacred stone; the Chinese, to this day, speak of their empire as the ‘middle kingdom.’ It was in accordance, then, with a simple tendency of human thought that the Jews believed the centre of the world to be Jerusalem.

“The book of Ezekiel speaks of Jerusalem as in the middle of the earth, and all other parts of the world as set around the holy city. Throughout the ‘ages of faith’ this was very generally accepted as a direct revelation from the Almighty regarding the earth’s form. St Jerome, the greatest authority of the early Church upon the Bible, declared, on the strength of this utterance of the prophet, that Jerusalem could be nowhere but at the earth’s centre; in the ninth century Archbishop Kabanus Maurus reiterated the same argument; in the eleventh century Hugh of St Victor gave to the doctrine another scriptural demonstration; and Pope Urban, in his great sermon at Clermont urging the Franks to the crusade, declared, ‘Jerusalem is the middle point of the earth’; in the thirteenth century an ecclesiastical writer much in vogue, the monk Cæsarius of Heisterbach, declared, ‘As the heart in the midst of the body, so is Jerusalem situated in the midst of our inhabited earth,’—‘so it was that Christ was crucified at the centre of the earth.’ Dante accepted this view of Jerusalem as a certainty, wedding it to immortal verse; and in the pious book of travels ascribed to Sir John Mandeville, so widely read in the Middle Ages, it is declared that Jerusalem is at the centre of the world, and that a spear standing erect at the Holy Sepulchre casts no shadow at the equinox.

“Ezekiel’s statement thus became the standard of orthodoxy to early map-makers. The map of the world at Hereford Cathedral, the maps of Andrea Bianco,

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[paragraph continues] Marino Sanuto, and a multitude of others fixed this view in men’s minds, and doubtless discouraged during many generations any scientific statements tending to unbalance this geographical centre revealed in Scripture.”

So much for the righteous indignation of modern physical science; now for cryptology and mysticism. M. W. Blackden, in a recent article on “The Mysteries and the ‘Book of the Dead,’” writes as follows 1:

“One other key there is . . . without which it is useless to approach The Book of the Dead with the idea of discussing any of those gems of wisdom for which old Egypt was so famous. . . . The knowledge of its existence is no recent discovery: it is simply that ancient nations such as the Egyptians, Chaldees, and Jews, had a system of symbolic geography. . . .

“The Jewish and Egyptian priestly caste endeavoured to map out their lands in accordance with their symbols of spiritual things, so far as the physical features would permit. This symbolism of mountain, city, plain, desert, and river extended from the various parts and furniture of the Lodge, to use Masonic phraseology, up to the spiritual anatomy, as it were, of both macrocosm and microcosm.

“Thus in the Jewish Scriptures it is not difficult to distinguish, in the prophetic battles of the nations that were to rage round about Jerusalem, the same symbolism as we have more directly expressed in a little old book called The Siege of Mansoul, the author of which was the John Bunyan of The Pilgrim’s Progress, a man who could well grasp the excellence of geographical symbolism.

“I cannot, of course, here enter at length into the geographical symbols of Egypt, it would take too long; but as I have given Jerusalem as a symbol, I may say

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further that Jerusalem as a symbol corresponds to the Egyptian On, or Heliopolis, and so astronomically to the centre of the world and of the universe, and in the microcosm to the spiritual Heart of Man. 1

“But there is one difference between the Hebrew and Egyptian city; for whereas the actual Jerusalem corresponds among the Hebrew prophets to that Jerusalem that now is, and is in bondage with her children, Heliopolis corresponded among the Egyptian priesthood to that city which was to come, the Heavenly City, the New Heart, that should be given to redeemed mankind.”

Here then we have a thesis that deserves a volume to itself; and so I leave it to him who has a mind to undertake the labour.

 

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Footnotes
135:1 The arising of the knowledge of God among the Gods, and the gradual descent of this knowledge down to man, reminds us somewhat of the method of the descent of the “Gospel” in the system of Basilides.

137:1 Or rather apocalypse; see § 15: “As Hermes says when he speaks unto me.”

137:2 Cf. the Egregores of The Book of Enoch; see Charles’ Translation (Oxford; 1893), Index, under “Watchers.”

137:3 The new Manvantara following a periodical Pralaya, to use the terms of Indo-Aryan tradition.

137:4 The creation is figured in one Egyptian tradition as the bursting forth of the Creator into seven peals of laughter,—a sevenfold “Ha!”

138:1 Cf. the “florescence” of § 10.

140:1 Cf. the same idea as expressed by Basilides (ap. Hipp., Philos., vii. 27), but in reversed order, when, speaking of the consummation of the world-process, and the final ascension of the “Sonship” with all its experience gained from union with matter, he says of the remaining souls, which have not reached the dignity of the Sonship, that the Great Ignorance shall come upon them for a space.

“Thus all the souls of this state of existence, whose nature is to remain immortal in this state of existence alone, remain without knowledge of anything different from or better than this state; nor shall there be any rumour or knowledge of things superior in higher states, in order that the lower souls may not suffer pain by striving after impossible objects, just as though it were fish longing to feed on the mountains with sheep, for such a desire would end in their destruction. All things are indestructible if they remain in their proper condition, but subject to destruction if they desire to overleap and transgress their natural limits” (F. F. F., p. 270).

141:1 Cf. Cyril, C. Jul., i. 35; Frag. xvi.

141:2 Cf. §§ 29 and 37.

143:1 Cf. Hermes-Prayer, iii. 3.

143:2 This is of special interest as showing how the Egyptian tradition, in this pre-eminent above all others, did not limit the manifestation to the male sex alone.

144:1 Cf. C. H., xviii. 8 ff.

145:1 The “spirituous” or “aery” body, or vehicle, is composed of the sub-elements, but in it is a predominance of the sub-element “air,” just as in the physical there is a predominance of “earth.”—Philoponus, Proœm. in Aristot. de Anima; see my Orpheus (London, 1896), “The Subtle Body,” pp. 276-281. Cf. also S. I. H., 15, 20.

146:1 Compare this with the prāṇa’s of Indian theosophy; see C. H., x. (xi.) 13, Comment.

148:1 Cf. Diog. Laert., Proœm., i.: “The Egyptians say that Hephæstus (Ptah) was the son of Neilus (the Nile), and that he was the originator of philosophy, of that philosophy whose leaders are priests and prophets”—that is to say, a mystic philosophy of revelation.

148:2 Thus Suidas (s.v. “Ptah”) says that Ptah was the Hephæstus of the Memphite priesthood, and tells us that there was a proverbial saying current among them: “Ptah hath spoken unto thee.” This reminds us of our text: “As Hermes says when he speaks unto me.”

148:3 The type of Isis as utterer of “sacred sermons,” describing herself as daughter or disciple of Hermes, is old, and goes back demonstrably to Ptolemaic times. R. 136, n. 4; 137, n. 1.

149:1 ὁπότ᾽ ἐμὲ καὶ τῷ τελείῳ μέλανι ἐτίμησεν. This has hitherto been always supposed by the philological mind simply to refer to the mysteries of ink or writing, and that too without any humorous intent, but in all portentous solemnity. We must imagine, then, presumably, that it refers to the schooldays of Isis, when she was first taught the Egyptian equivalents for pothooks and hangers. This absurdity is repeated even by Meineke.

150:1 The more correct title of this work should be “Gnostic Jottings (or Notes) according to the True Philosophy,” as Clement states himself and as has been well remarked by Hort in his Ante-Nicene Fathers, p. 87 (London, 1895).

150:2 Op. cit., v. 11. Sopater (Dist. Quæst., p. 123, ed. Walz) speaks of these as “figures” (σχήματα), the same expression which Proclus (In Plat. Rep., p. 380) employs in speaking of the appearances which the Gods assume in their manifestations; Plato (Phædr., p. 250) calls them “blessed apparitions,” or beatific visions” (εὐδαίμονα φάσματα); the author of the Epinomis (p. 986) describes them as “what is most beautiful to see in the world”; these are the “mystic sights” or “wonders” (μυστικὰ θεάματα) of Dion Chrysostom (Orat., xii., p. 387, ed. Reiske); the “holy appearances” (ἅγια φαντάσματα) and “sacred shows” (ἱερὰ δεικνύμενα) of Plutarch (Wyttenbach, Fragm., vi. 1, t. v., p. 722, and De Profect. Virtut. Sent., p. 81, ed. Reiske); the “ineffable apparitions” (ἄρρητα φάσματα) of Aristides (Orat., xix. p. 416, ed. Dindorf); the “divine apparitions” (θεῖα φάσματα) of Himerius (Eclog., xxxii., p. 304, ed. Wernsdorf),—those sublime sights the memory of which was said to accompany the souls of the righteous into the after-life, and when they returned to birth. Cf. Lenormant (F.) on “The Eleusinian Mysteries” in The Contemporary Review (Sept. 1880), p. 416, who, however, thinks that these famous philosophers and writers bankrupted their adjectives merely for the mechanical figures and stage-devices of the lower degrees. See my “Notes on the Eleusinian Mysteries” in The Theosophical Review (April, May, June, 1898), vol. xxii., p. 156.

151:1 De Is. et Os., xxi.

151:2 Berl phil. Wochenschr. (1896), p. 1528; R. 137, n. 3.

151:3 R. 133, n. 2.

151:4 προτογόνῳ—cf. the προγενεστέρου πάντων above.

151:5 Epeius, ap. Eusebius, Præp. Ev., i. 10, p. 41 D.

151:6 Ap. Euseb., Præp., iii. 11, 45, p. 115.

152:1 Cf. the epithet “utterly hidden” found in the “Words (Logoi) of Ammon,” referred to by Justin Martyr, Cohort., xxxviii., and the note thereon in “Fragments from the Fathers.”

152:2 Typified by the dark-coloured body.

152:3 ζωοποιός—typified, presumably, by the girdle (the symbol of the woman) and the staff (the symbol of the man).

152:4 Chron., xl. (ed. Dind., i. 72).

153:1 Varro, De Gente Pop. Rom., ap. Augustine, De Civ. Dei, xviii. 3, 8; R. 139, n. 3.

154:1 It is said that with regard to ancient archaic texts which are still extant, modern Egyptology is able to translate them with greater accuracy than the priests of Manetho’s day; but this one may be allowed to question, unless the ancient texts are capable solely of a physical interpretation.

154:2 The Hermes, presumably, who was fabled to be the son of the Nile, not the physical Nile, but the Heaven Ocean, the Great Green, the Soul of Cosmos, and whom, we are told, the Egyptians would never speak of publicly, but, presumably, only within the circles of initiation. This Nile may be in one sense the Flood that hid the Books of Hermes in its depths or zones; but equally so the son of Nile may be the first Hermes after the Flood.

155:1 Wessley, Denkschr. d. k. Akad. (1893), p. 37, l. 500.

155:2 So R., though this is a meaning to which the lexicons give no support; the verb generally meaning “to defer” or “assent to.”

156:1 Compare also the mystery ritual in The Acts of John: “I am thy God, not that of the betrayer” (F. F. F., p. 434).

156:2 As the Gnostic Marcus would have called it.

156:3 On this ἱερός γάμος or γάμος πνευματικός, see Lobeck (C. A.), Aglaophamus (Königsberg, 1829), 608, 649, 651.

157:1 That is, the Agathodaimon.

157:2 That is, the “Birth of Horus.” Hippolytus, Philos., v. 8 (ed. Dunk, and Schneid, pp. 164, 166, ll. 86-94). see “Myth of Man in the Mysteries,” § 28. The last clause is the gloss of the later Christian over-writer.

158:1 The text is to be found in James (M. R.), Apocrypha Anecdota, ii. (Cambridge, 1897), in Texts and Studies; F. F. F., pp. 432, 433.

158:2 De Is. et Os., xxxiii.

158:3 Cf. this with K. K., 47, where Egypt is said to occupy the position of the heart of the earth.

158:4 Cf. K. K., 20: “Ye brilliant stars, eyes of the gods.”

158:5 Cited by Ebers, “Die Körperteile in Altägyptischen,” Abh. d. k. bayr. Akad. (1897), p. 111, where other references are given.

159:1 Compare also the Naassene document, § 8, in the “Myth of Man” chapter of the Prolegomena, where Isis is called “the seven-robed and black-mantled goddess.”

160:1 Cf. “Isis, the Queen of Heaven, whose most ancient and distinctive title was the Virgin Mother.” Marsham Adams (F.), The Book of the Master, or the Egyptian Doctrine of the Light born of the Virgin Mother (London, 1898), p. 63.

160:2 Hær., li. 22.

160:3 And pre-eminently, therefore, for Epiphanius, the Egyptians.

161:1 That is, the Temple of Korē. This can hardly be the Temple of Persephonē, as Dindorf (iii. 729) suggests, but rather the Temple of Isis.

161:2 Cf. D. J. L., pp. 407 ff.

162:1 Though some have conjectured that the “cock” was the popular name for the Temple-watchman who called the hours.

163:1 See below, where the story is given from Plutarch’s Moralia.

163:2 Compare The Book of the Dead, lxxviii. 31, 32; Budge’s Trans. (London, 1901), ii. 255: “I shall come forth . . . into the House of Isis, the divine lady. I shall behold sacred things which are hidden, and I shall be led on to the secret and holy things, even as they have granted unto me to see the birth of the Great God. Horus hath made me to be a spiritual body through his soul, [and I see what is therein].” Compare the last sentence with C. H., i. 7, and xi. (xii.) 6, where the pupil “sees” by means of the soul of his Master.

164:1 This passage, I believe, affords us an objective point of departure for the reconsideration of C. W. Leadbeater’s statement, in his Christian Creed (London, 1898), p, 45, that “Pontius Pilate” is a pseudo-historical gloss for πόντος πιλητός, the “dense sea” of “matter,” into which the soul is plunged. See for a discussion of this hypothesis D. T. L., pp. 423 ff.

In connection with this a colleague has supplied me with an exceedingly interesting note from Texts and Studies, iv. 2, Coptic Apocryphal Gospels, p. 177, Frag. 4. The Sahidic text is found in Rendiconti della R. Accademia dei Lincei, vol. iii., sem. 2, pp. 381-384 (Frammenti Copti, Nota Via), by Ignazio Guidi (1887). The legend runs that the Devil taking “the form of a fisherman,” goes fishing, and is met by Jesus as He was coming down from the Mount with His disciples. The Devil announces that “he who catcheth fish here, he is the Master. It is not a wonder to catch fish in the waters, the wonder is in this desert, to catch fish therein.” They then have a trial of skill, but the MS. unfortunately breaks off before the result is told. It is in this Fragment that the following remarkable sentence occurs: “Now as Pilate was saying these things before the authorities of Tiberius, the king, Herod, could not refrain from setting Pilate at naught, saying, ‘Thou art a Galilæan foreign Egyptian Pontus.’” The literal translation from the Coptic runs: “Thou art a Pontus Galilæan foreign Egyptian.”

165:1 Compare, for instance, Kaṭhopaniṣhad, Sec. ii., Pt. ii., iv. 11, 12: “The Man, of the size of a thumb, resides in the midst, within in the self, of the past and the future the lord; from him a man hath no desire to hide. This verily is That.

“The Man, of the size of a thumb, like flame free from smoke, of past and of future the lord, the same is to-day, to-morrow the same will he be. This verily is That.”—Mead and Chaṭṭopādhyāya’s Trans. (London, 1896), i. 68, 69.

Here “to-day” and “to-morrow” are said by some to refer to different incarnations; the “Man” (puruṣha) being the potential Self, destined finally to become, or grow into the stature of, the Great Self (Maha-puruṣha).

165:2 See the article, “Theosophic Light on Bible Shadows,” in The Theosophical Review (Nov. 1904), xxxv. 230, 231.

165:3 The minute image of a person reflected in the pupil of the eye of another may to some extent account for the popular belief underlying this identification.

166:1 The same idea which we found above in connection with Ammon.

166:2 To go “a-whoring” after strange gods and strange doctrines was the graphic figure invariably employed by Hebrew orthodoxy; “to commit fornication” not unfrequently echoes the same idea in the New Testament.

167:1 For the latest study on the subject, see Monseur (E.), “L’Âme Pupilline,” Rev. de l’Hist. des Relig. (Jan. and Feb. 1905), who discusses the significance in primitive religion of the reflected image to be seen in the pupil of the eye. This “little man” of the eye was taken to be its soul, and to control all its functions.

167:2 Cf., for the idea in the mind of the ancients, Tim. 45 B: “So much of the fire as would not burn, but gave a gentle light, they formed into a substance akin to the light of every-day life; and the pure fire which is within us and related thereto they made to flow through the eyes in a stream smooth and dense, compressing the whole eye, and especially the centre part, so that it kept out everything of a coarser nature, and allowed to pass only this pure element.”

169:1 De Defectu Oraculorum, xxi., xxii. (42lA-422C), ed. G. N. Bernardakis (Leipzig, 1891), iii. 97-101. See my paper, “Plutarch’s Yogī,” in The Theosophical Review (Dec. 1891), ix. 295-297.

170:1 In this referring to the passage in the Timæus, (55 C D), which runs: “Now, he who, duly reflecting on all this, enquires whether the worlds are to be regarded as indefinite or definite in number, will be of opinion that the notion of their indefiniteness is characteristic of a sadly indefinite and ignorant mind. He, however, who raises the question whether they are to be truly regarded as one or five, takes up a more reasonable position” (Jowett’s Trans., 3rd ed., iii. 475, 476).

171:1 Cf. S. I. H., 3: “Now as I chance myself to be as though initiate into the nature that transcendeth death, and that my feet have crossed the Plain of Truth”; and K. K., 22: “The Monarch came, and sitting on the Throne of Truth made answer to their prayers.” The locus classicus is, of course, Plato, Phædrus, 248 B.

171:2 Cf. K. K., 37: “’Tis they who, taught by Hermes that the things below have been disposed by God to be in sympathy with things above, established on the earth the sacred rites o’er which the mysteries in heaven preside.”

172:1 Our difficulty, however, is that Plutarch, in the words of one of his characters, rejects the idea of this numbering being in any way Egyptian, and ascribes it to a certain Petron of Himera in Sicily,—thereby suggesting a probable Pythagorean connection.

173:1 See the section, “Some Outlines of Æonology,” F. F. F., pp. 311-335.

173:2 See my Orpheus (London, 1896), pp. 255-262.

173:3 Cf. Taylor (T.), “Introd. to Timæus,” Works of Plato (London, 1804), p. 442.

174:1 Rep., viii. 545C-547A. See Adam (J.), The Nuptial Number of Plato: Its Solution and Significance (London, 1891).

175:1 Which may have been regarded as the prototypes of the soul-spaces.

176:1 Comment. in Plat. Tim., 216C; ed. C. E. C. Schneider (Vratislaviæ, 1847), p. 250.

176:2 A passage which Proclus, op. cit., 213A (ed. Sch., p. 152) further explains by means of the “harmonic canon” or ruler.

176:3 Jowett (B.), Dialogues of Plato (3rd ed., Oxford, 1892), iii. 403.

176:4 Cf. text 36C: “The motion of the same he carried round by the side to the right, and the motion of the diverse diagonally to the left,”—that is the side of the rectangular figure supposed to be inscribed in the circle of the “same,” and diagonally, across the rectangular figure from corner to corner; and 38D, 39A: “Now, when all the stars which were necessary to the creation of time [i.e. the spheres of the sun, moon, and five planets] had attained a motion suitable to them, and had become living creatures, having bodies fastened by vital chains, and learned their appointed task, moving in the motion of the diverse, which is diagonal, and passes through, and is governed by the motion of the same, they revolved, some in a larger and some in a lesser orbit. . . . The motion of the same made them turn all in a spiral.” With these instruments of “time,” surrounded by the sphere of the same, compare the idea of time flowing down on the worlds, from the Æon, in the story of Cleombrotus.

178:1 So quoted in Andrew Dickson White’s History of the Warfare of Science with Theology in Christendom (New York, 1898), i. 92. Dr White, unfortunately, does not give the exact reference. The “fan” is, of course, the winnowing fan, a broad basket into which the corn mixed with chaff was received after threshing, and was then thrown up into the wind, so as to disperse the chaff and leave the grain.

178:2 Alexander of Aphrodisias, Comment. on Aristotle in Meteor., 91r (vol. i., 268 I d); Diels, Doxographi Græci (Berlin, 1879), p. 478. Cf. Aëtius, De Placitis Reliquiæ, iii. 10 (Diels, 579).

178:3 Plutarch, Strom., 2 (Diels, 579). See Fairbanks (A.), The First Philosophers of Greece (London, 1898), pp. 13, 14.

179:1 Delitzsch also, in his Babel und Bibel, states that the great debt of early Greece to Assyria will be made clear in a forthcoming work of German scholarship.

180:1 I have also got a stray reference, “κύλινδρος, Plut., 2, 682 C, Xylander’s pages,” but I have not been able to verify this.

180:2 See Cumont (F.), Textes et Monuments figurés relat. aux Mystères de Mithra (Bruxelles, 1899), i. 315.

181:1 Ps. Augustine, Quæstt. Vet. et Nov. Test. (Migne, P. L., tom, xxxiv. col. 2214 f.).

181:2 De Abstinentia, iv. 16 (ed. Nauck, p. 253).

181:3 Cf. Clement of Alexandria on the Basilidian theory of “appendages,” remembering that the School of Basilides was strongly tinctured with Egyptian ideas. “The Basilidians are accustomed to give the name of appendages (or accretions) to the passions. These essences, they say, have a certain substantial existence, and are attached to the rational soul, owing to a certain turmoil and primitive confusion. On to this nucleus other bastard and alien natures of the essence grow, such as those of the wolf, ape, lion, goat, etc. . . . And not only do human souls thus intimately associate themselves with the impulses and impressions of irrational animals, but they even initiate the movements and beauties of plants, because they likewise bear the characteristics of plants appended to them. Nay, there are also certain characteristics [of minerals] shown by habits, such as the hardness of adamant” (F. F. F., p. 276).

182:1 Metamorphoses, Book xi.

182:2 Which Pindar and Herodotus ascribed to Homer himself.

182:3 See Frag. I. from the Scholion on Hom., Il., i. 5 ff.

182:4 See K. K., 34.

183:1 Frag. 369-374B (ed. Dind.); the context of which some believe to be found in Lucian’s Hermotimus, 20.

183:2 Frag. 29, from the Scholion on Aristophanes, Pax, 357.

183:3 Rep., vi. 487A: “Nor would even Momus find fault with this.”

183:4 De Partt. Animal., iii. 2.

183:5 And also at the end of his Hymn to Apollo, ii. 112; also Epigram. Frag., 70.

183:6 Or., 49; ed. Jebb, p. 497.

183:7 Cf. Julian, Ep. ad Dionys.

183:8 Dial. Deor., xx. 2.

183:9 Hermot., xx.; cf. Nig., xxxii.; Dial. Deor., ix.; Ver. Hist., ii. 3; Bab. Fab., lix.; and Jup. Trag., xxii.

183:10 Deor. Consil, iv.

184:1 Philostratus, Ep. 21.

184:2 For the above and other references, see Trümpel’s art. “Momus,” in Roscher’s Lexicon.

184:3 Lug., 194, 59.

184:4 See Nestle’s art. “Mammon,” in Cheyne’s Encyclopædia Biblica.

184:5 Op. supra cit., i. 98, 99.

186:1 The Theosophical Review (July, 1902), vol. xxx. pp. 406, 407.

187:1 “There is an old map of the world in the British Museum which demonstrates both these significations. See also Mappa Mundi, ‘Ebsdorf,’ 1284, and that in Hereford Cathedral made by Richard of Haldingham, one of the Prebends, 1290-1310.”

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

THE

ENGLISH LANGUAGE

TRANSMUTED INTO NUMBER IS ONE OF THE MAIN CONDUITS THROUGH WHICH APPEAR CLEARER UNDERSTANDING OF THOSE REFRACTED PATTERNS APPARENTLY RANDOM DESCRIBING ENERGIES WHICH INTERMINGLED WITHIN THE GREATER HERE AND NOW OF REALITY ARE CONSIDERED THE LIVING EXPERIENCE REVELATORY OF THE CREATORS CONSCIOUS ETERNAL DIVINE THOUGHT

 

 

WISDOM OF THE EAST

by Hari Prasad Shastri 1948

Page 8

"There is no such word in Sanscrita as 'Creation' applied to the universe. The Sanscrita word for Creation is Shristi, which means 'projection' Creation means to bring something into being out /Page 9/ of nothing, to create, as a novelist creates a character. There was no Miranda, for example, until Shakespeare created her. Similarly the ancient Indians (this term is innacurately used as there was no India at that time). who were our ancestors long, long ago. used a word for creation that means 'projection'

 

 

THE LOST LANGUAGE OF SYMBOLISM

Harold Bayley 1912

Page 278

""According to the authors of The Perfect Way, the words IS and ISH originally meant Light, and the name ISIS, once ISH-ISH, was Egyptian for Light-Light."

 

6
ISH-ISH
72
36
9
4
ISHI
45
36
9

 

Page 278

"ONE-EYE, TWO-EYES, THREE-EYES"

"According to the authors of The Perfect Way, the words IS and ISH originally meant Light, and the name ISIS, once ISH-ISH,

 

 

HOLY BIBLE

Scofield References

Page 922

HOSEA

C 2 V 16

" And it shall be at that day, saith the LORD, that thou shalt call me Ishi; and shalt call me no more Baali."

 

 

AND IT SHALL BE AT THAT DAY SAITH THE LORD THAT THOU SHALT CALL ME

ISHI

 

 

Middle Eastern Mythology

S. H. Hooke 1963

Page 111/112

Hebrew Mythology

"Next, and again out of the soil, Yahweh moulds animals and birds, to see if they may provide a help for the man, but since the man recognizes none of these as suitable for this purpose, Yahweh causes a magic sleep (the Hebrew /word tardemah indicates a supernatural sleep; compare Gen. 15:12) to overwhelm the man, and takes out a 'rib' (the Hebrew word also means 'side' and 'builds' it into a woman as his counterpoint, and in 3:20 gives her the name Hawwah, Eve, which means 'life'. The other apellation given to her in 2:3, Ishshah, is not a proper name but the usual Hebrew word for 'wife', the feminine of 'ish, man, or husband (cf. Hos. 2:16).

 

ISHSHAH

 

 

HASHISH

hashish: meaning and definitions — Infoplease.com hashish: Definition and Pronunciation. ... Pronunciation: (hashsh, -ish, ha-shēsh', -), [key] —n. 1. the flowering tops and leaves of Indian hemp smoked ...
dictionary.infoplease.com/hashish

hashish

Pronunciation: (hashsh, -ish, ha-shēsh', -), [key]
—n.
1. the flowering tops and leaves of Indian hemp smoked, chewed, or drunk as a narcotic and intoxicant.
2. the dried resinous exudate of the flowering tops of this plant, containing larger amounts of the active ingredient. Also,hash•eeshPronunciation: ('shēsh, -shēsh').

 

 

Shapash, the Phoenician Sun Goddess--Sapas, Shapshu,sun goddess ...
An ongoing project with detailed historical information about the more obscure Goddesses: this page features Shapash, the Torch of the Gods, the Phoenician ...
www.thaliatook.com/OGOD/shapash.html - Similar

 

Phoenician and Canaanite Goddesses--Astarte Ashtart Athirat Anat ...
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Shapash (Semitic deity) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia
Britannica online encyclopedia article on Shapash (Semitic deity), Another group of gods play important subordinate roles in the myths.
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Shapash
2 May 1998 ... The Ugaritic goddess of the sun. She was often called 'torch of the gods.'
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Shapash (Canaanite goddess) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Shapash or Shapshu (Ugaritic Canaanite), attested at Ugarit in the Shapash hymn, also Shemesh (Hebrew: שמש‎), was the Canaanite goddess of the sun, ...
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Esagila - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
26 Apr 2009 ... The Esagila complex, completed in its final form by Nebuchadrezzar II (604–562 BC) encasing earlier cores, was the center of Babylon. ...
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Esagila
From Wikipedi, the free encyclopedia
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Coordinates: 32°32′2″N 44°25′17″E / 32.53389°N 44.42139°E / 32.53389; 44.42139
Ancient Near East portal
The Ésagila, a Sumerian name signifying "É (temple) whose top is lofty",[1] (literally: "house of the raised head") was a temple dedicated to Marduk, the protector god of Babylon. It lay south of the ziggurat Etemenanki, a memory of which has been perpetuated in Judeo-Christian culture as the Tower of Babel.

In this temple was the cult image inhabited by Marduk, surrounded by cult images of the cities that had fallen under the hegemony of the Babylonian Empire from the 18th century BC; there was also a little lake which was named Abzu by the Babylonian priests. This Abzu was a representantion of Marduk's father, Enki, who was god of the waters and lived in the Abzu that was the source of all the fresh waters.

The Esagila complex, completed in its final form by Nebuchadrezzar II (604–562 BC) encasing earlier cores, was the center of Babylon. It comprised a large court (ca. 40×70 sq. meters), containing a smaller court (ca. 25×40 m2), and finally the central shrine, consisting of an anteroom and the inner sanctum which contained the statues of Marduk and his consort Sarpanit.

According to Herodotus, Xerxes had a statue removed from the Esagila when he flooded Babylon in 482 BC, desecrated the Esagila and sacked the city. Alexander the Great ordered restorations, and the temple continued to be maintained throughout the second century BC, as one of the last strongholds of Babylonian culture, such as literacy in the cuneiform script, but as Babylon was gradually abandoned under the Parthian Empire, the temple fell into decay in the first century BC.

Under the enormous heap of debris that lay over it, Esagila was rediscovered by Robert Koldewey in November 1900, but it did not begin to be seriously examined until 1910. The rising water table has obliterated much of the sun-dried brick and other oldest material. Most of the finds at Babylon reflect the Neo-Babylonian period and later. Data from the Esagila tablet,[2] copied from older texts in 229 BC, have aided in its reconstruction. The tablet, described by George Smith in 1872, disappeared for some time into private hands before it resurfaced and began to be interpreted.

 

Etemenanki- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
27 Apr 2009 ... It took 88 years to rebuild the city; its central feature was the temple of Marduk (Esagila), to which the Etemenanki ziggurat was ...
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Esagila
After he had killed her, he brought order to the cosmos, built the Esagila, and created mankind. In the poem Enûma êliš it is stated that all other gods are ...
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Ruin of Esagila chronicle (BCHP 6)
Translated text that describes how a Seleucid crown prince (probably Antiochus, the son of king Seleucus Nicator) fell during a sacrifice on the ruin of ...
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ESAGILA

 

 

Seven deadly sins - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Seven Deadly Sins, also known as the Capital Vices or Cardinal Sins, is a classification of the most objectionable vices which has been used since early ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_deadly_sins - Cached - Similar

Beginning in the early 14th century, the popularity of the seven deadly sins as a theme among European artists of the time eventually helped to ingrain them in many areas of Christian culture and Christian consciousness in general throughout the world. One means of such ingraining was the creation of the mnemonic "SALIGIA" based on the first letters in Latin of the seven deadly sins: superbia, avaritia, luxuria, invidia, gula, ira, acedia.

SALIGIA

 

Seven deadly sins - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Seven Deadly Sins, also known as the Capital Vices or Cardinal Sins, is a classification of the most objectionable vices which has been used since early ...en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_deadly_sins - Cached - Similar

Seven deadly sins
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This article needs additional citations for verification.
Please help improve this article by adding reliable references. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (May 2008)

For other uses, see Seven deadly sins (disambiguation) and Cardinal sin (disambiguation).

Hieronymus Bosch's The Seven Deadly Sins and the Four Last Things.The Seven Deadly Sins, also known as the Capital Vices or Cardinal Sins, is a classification of the most objectionable vices which has been used since early Christian times to educate and instruct followers concerning (immoral) fallen man's tendency to sin. It consists of "Lust", "Gluttony", "Greed", "Sloth", "Wrath", "Envy", and "Pride".

The Catholic Church divided sin into two principal categories: "Venial sins", which are relatively minor, and could be forgiven through any Sacramentals or Sacraments of the church, and the more severe "Capital" or Mortal sins. Mortal sins destroyed the life of grace, and created the threat of eternal damnation unless either absolved through the sacrament of Confession, or forgiven through perfect contrition on the part of the penitent.

Beginning in the early 14th century, the popularity of the seven deadly sins as a theme among European artists of the time eventually helped to ingrain them in many areas of Christian culture and Christian consciousness in general throughout the world. One means of such ingraining was the creation of the mnemonic "SALIGIA" based on the first letters in Latin of the seven deadly sins: superbia, avaritia, luxuria, invidia, gula, ira, acedia.[1]

Contents [hide]
1 Historic Lists of Sins
1.1 Biblical Lists
1.2 Development of the Traditional Seven Sins
2 The sins
2.1 Extravagance
2.1.1 Lust
2.2 Gluttony
2.3 Greed
2.4 Acedia
2.4.1 Despair
2.4.2 Sloth
2.5 Wrath
2.6 Envy
2.7 Pride
2.7.1 Vainglory
3 Catholic virtues
4 Associations with demons
5 Cultural references
5.1 Enneagram Integration
5.2 Literary works inspired by the seven deadly sins
5.3 Art and music
5.4 Film, television, radio, comic books and video games
6 References
7 See also
8 Further reading
9 External links

[edit] Historic Lists of Sins

[edit] Biblical Lists
In the Book of Proverbs, it is stated that the Lord specifically regards "six things the Lord hateth, and the seventh His soul detesteth." namely[2]:

Haughty eyes
A lying tongue
Hands that shed innocent blood
A heart that devises wicked plots
Feet that are swift to run into mischief
A deceitful witness that uttereth lies
Him that soweth discord among brethren
While there are seven of them, this list is considerably different to the traditional one, the only sin on both lists being pride. Another list of bad things, given this time by the Epistle to the Galatians, includes more of the traditional seven sins, although the list is substantially longer: adultery, fornication, uncleanness, lasciviousness, idolatry, witchcraft, hatred, variance, emulations, wrath, strife, seditions, heresies, envyings, murders, drunkenness, revellings, "and such like"[3].

[edit] Development of the Traditional Seven Sins
The modern concept of the Seven Deadly Sins is linked to the works of the 4th century monk Evagrius Ponticus, who listed eight evil thoughts, in Latin, as follows[4]:

Gula (gluttony)
Fornicatio (fornication, lust)
Avaritia (avarice/greed)
Tristitia (sorrow)
Ira (wrath)
Acedia (acedia/despair)
Vanagloria (vainglory)
Superbia (Pride)
These 'evil thoughts' can be broken down into three groups[5]:

lustful appetite (Gluttony, Fornication, and Avarice)
irascibility (Anger)
intellect (Vainglory, Sorrow, Pride, and Discouragement)
In 590 AD, some years after Ponticus, Pope Gregory I revised this list to form the more common Seven Deadly Sins, by folding sorrow into despair, vainglory into pride, and adding extravagance and envy, while removing fornication from the list. In the order used by both Pope Gregory and by Dante Alighieri in his epic poem The Divine Comedy, the seven deadly sins are as follows:

1.luxuria (extravagance)
2.gula (gluttony)
3.avaritia (avarice/greed)
4.acedia (acedia/discouragement)
5.ira (wrath)
6.invidia (envy)
7.superbia (pride)
The identification and definition of the seven deadly sins over their history has been a fluid process and the idea of what each of the seven actually encompasses has evolved over time. Additionally, as a result of semantic change:

cupida (lust) was substituted for luxuria in all but name
socordia (sloth) was substituted for acedia
This process of change has been aided by the fact that the personality traits are not collectively referred to, in either a cohesive or codified manner, by the Bible itself; other literary and ecclesiastical works were instead consulted, as sources from which definitions might be drawn. Part II of Dante's Divine Comedy, Purgatorio, has almost certainly been the best known source since the Renaissance.

The modern Roman Catholic Catechism lists the sins as: "pride, avarice, envy, wrath, lust, gluttony, and sloth/acedia".[6]. Each of the seven deadly sins now also has an opposite among corresponding seven holy virtues (sometimes also referred to as the contrary virtues). In parallel order to the sins they oppose, the seven holy virtues are chastity, temperance, charity, diligence, patience, kindness, and humility.

[edit] The sins

[edit] Extravagance
Main article: Extravagance
Extravagance (Latin, luxuria) is unrestrained excess. Extravagant behaviour includes the frequent purchase of luxury goods, and forms of debauchery.

In the Romance languages, the cognates of luxuria (the latin name of the sin) evolved to have an exclusively sexual meaning; the Old French cognate was adopted into English as luxury, but this lost its sexual meaning by the 14th century[7]. The church found it more practical and politically expedient to allow this more restricted interpretation to become dominant, resulting in lust replacing extravagance in the list.

[edit] Lust
This article may contain original research or unverified claims. Please improve the article by adding references. See the talk page for details. (May 2009)
This article or section may contain unpublished synthesis of published material that conveys ideas not attributable to the original sources. See the talk page for details. (May 2009)

Main article: Lust
Lust (Latin, Cupidita), or lechery, is usually thought of as excessive thoughts or desires of a sexual nature. Dante's criterion was excessive love of others, which therefore rendered love and devotion to God as secondary.

Giving in to lusts can lead to sexual or sociological compulsions and/or transgressions including (but not limited to) sexual addiction, fornication, adultery, bestiality, rape, perversion, and incest. In Dante's Purgatorio, the penitent walks within flames to purge himself of lustful/sexual thoughts and feelings.

[edit] Gluttony
Main article: Gluttony

"Excess"
(Albert Anker, 1896)Derived from the Latin gluttire, meaning to gulp down or swallow, gluttony (Latin, gula) is the over-indulgence and over-consumption of anything to the point of waste. In the Christian religions, it is considered a sin because of the excessive desire for food, or its withholding from the needy.[8]

Depending on the culture, it can be seen as either a vice or a sign of status. Where food is relatively scarce, being able to eat well might be something to take pride in (although this can also result in a moral backlash when confronted with the reality of those less fortunate). Where food is routinely plentiful, it may be considered a sign of self-control to resist the temptation to over-indulge.

Medieval church leaders (e.g., Thomas Aquinas) took a more expansive view of gluttony,[8] arguing that it could also include an obsessive anticipation of meals, and the constant eating of delicacies and excessively costly foods.[9] Aquinas went so far as to prepare a list of six ways to commit gluttony, including:

Praepropere - eating too soon.
Laute - eating too expensively (washedly).
Nimis - eating too much.
Ardenter - eating too eagerly (burningly).
Studiose - eating too daintily (keenly).
Forente - eating wildly (boringly).

[edit] Greed
Main article: Greed
Greed (Latin, avaritia), also known as avarice or covetousness, is, like lust and gluttony, a sin of excess. However, greed (as seen by the church) is applied to the acquisition of wealth in particular. St. Thomas Aquinas wrote that greed was "a sin against God, just as all mortal sins, in as much as man condemns things eternal for the sake of temporal things." In Dante's Purgatory, the penitents were bound and laid face down on the ground for having concentrated too much on earthly thoughts. "Avarice" is more of a blanket term that can describe many other examples of greedy behavior. These include disloyalty, deliberate betrayal, or treason,[citations needed] especially for personal gain, for example through bribery . Scavenging[citation needed] and hoarding of materials or objects, theft and robbery, especially by means of violence, trickery, or manipulation of authority are all actions that may be inspired by greed. Such misdeeds can include simony, where one profits from soliciting goods within the actual confines of a church.

[edit] Acedia
Main article: Acedia
Acedia (Latin, acedia) (from Greek ακηδία = neglect to take care of something - and in this case neglect to do whatever one should do in order to be saved) is apathetic listlessness; depression without joy. It is similar to melancholy, although acedia describes the behaviour, while melancholy suggests the emotion producing it. In early Christian thought, the lack of joy was regarded as a wilful refusal to enjoy the goodness of God and the world God created; by contrast, the apathy was regarded as a spiritual affliction that discouraged people from their religious work.

When Thomas Aquinas described acedia in his interpretation of the list, he described it as an uneasiness of the mind, being a progenitor for lesser sins such as restlessness and instability. Dante refined this definition further, describing acedia as the failure to love God with all one's heart, all one's mind and all one's soul; to him it was the middle sin, the only one characterised by an absence or insufficiency of love.

[edit] Despair
Main article: Despair
Despair (Latin, Tristitia) describes a feeling of dissatisfaction or discontent, which causes unhappiness with one's current situation. Since unhappiness inherently results from the sin, the sin was sometimes referred to as sadness. Since sadness often results in acedia, Pope Gregory's revision of the list subsumed Despair into Acedia.

This section requires expansion.

[edit] Sloth
Main article: Sloth (deadly sin)
Gradually, the focus came to be on the consequences of acedia, rather than the cause, and so, by the 17th century, the exact deadly sin referred to was believed to be the failure to utilize one's talents and gifts.[citation needed] In practice, it came to be closer to sloth (Latin, Socordia) than acedia. Even in Dante's time there were signs of this change; in his Purgatorio he had portrayed the penance for acedia as running continuously at top speed.

The modern view goes further, regarding laziness and indifference as the sin at the heart of the matter. Since this contrasts with a more wilful failure to, for example, love God and his works, sloth is often seen as being considerably less serious than the other sins, more a sin of omission than of commission.

The sloth, a South American mammal, was named after this sin by Roman Catholic explorers.

[edit] Wrath
Main article: Wrath
Wrath (Latin, ira), also known as anger or "rage", may be described as inordinate and uncontrolled feelings of hatred and anger. These feelings can manifest as vehement denial of the truth, both to others and in the form of self-denial, impatience with the procedure of law, and the desire to seek revenge outside of the workings of the justice system (such as engaging in vigilantism) and generally wishing to do evil or harm to others. The transgressions born of vengeance are among the most serious, including murder, assault, and in extreme cases, genocide. Wrath is the only sin not necessarily associated with selfishness or self-interest (although one can of course be wrathful for selfish reasons, such as jealousy, closely related to the sin of envy). Dante described vengeance as "love of justice perverted to revenge and spite". In its original form, the sin of wrath also encompassed anger pointed internally rather than externally. Thus suicide was deemed as the ultimate, albeit tragic, expression of wrath directed inwardly, a final rejection of God's gifts.

[edit] Envy
Main article: Envy
Like greed, Envy (Latin, invidia) may be characterized by an insatiable desire; they differ, however, for two main reasons. First, greed is largely associated with material goods, whereas envy may apply more generally. Second, those who commit the sin of envy resent that another person has something they perceive themselves as lacking, and wish the other person to be deprived of it. Dante defined this as "love of one's own good perverted to a desire to deprive other men of theirs." In Dante's Purgatory, the punishment for the envious is to have their eyes sewn shut with wire because they have gained sinful pleasure from seeing others brought low. Aquinas described envy as "sorrow for another's good".[10]

[edit] Pride
Main article: Pride
In almost every list Pride (Latin, superbia), or hubris, is considered the original and most serious of the seven deadly sins, and indeed the ultimate source from which the others arise. It is identified as a desire to be more important or attractive than others, failing to acknowledge the good work of others, and excessive love of self (especially holding self out of proper position toward God). Dante's definition was "love of self perverted to hatred and contempt for one's neighbor." In Jacob Bidermann's medieval miracle play, Cenodoxus, pride is the deadliest of all the sins and leads directly to the damnation of the titulary famed Parisian doctor. In perhaps the best-known example, the story of Lucifer, pride (his desire to compete with God) was what caused his fall from Heaven, and his resultant transformation into Satan. In Dante's Divine Comedy, the penitents were forced to walk with stone slabs bearing down on their backs in order to induce feelings of humility.

[edit] Vainglory
Main article: Vainglory
Vainglory (Latin, vanagloria) is unjustified boasting. Pope Gregory viewed it as a form of pride, so he folded vainglory into pride for his listing of sins.

The latin term gloria roughly means boasting, although its English cognate - glory - has come to have an exclusively positive meaning; historically, vain roughly meant futile, but by the 14th century had come to have the strong narcissistic undertones, of irrelevant accuracy, that it retains today[11]. As a result of these semantic changes, vainglory has become a rarely used word in itself, and is now commonly interpreted as referring to vanity (in its modern narcissistic sense).

[edit] Catholic virtues
The Roman Catholic Church also recognizes Seven Virtues which correspond inversely to each of the seven deadly sins.

Vice Virtue
Lust Chastity
Gluttony Temperance
Greed Charity
Sloth Diligence
Wrath Patience
Envy Kindness
Pride Humility

[edit] Associations with demons
In 1589, Peter Binsfeld paired each of the deadly sins with a demon, who tempted people by means of the associated sin. According to Binsfeld's classification of demons, the pairings are as follows

Lucifer: Pride (superbia)
Mammon: Greed (avaritia)
Asmodeus: Lust (luxuria)
Leviathan: Envy (invidia)
Beelzebub: Gluttony (gula or gullia)
Satan/Amon: Wrath (ira)
Belphegor: Sloth (acedia)
There are also other demons who invoke sin, for instance Lilith and her offspring, the incubi and succubi, invoke lust. The succubi sleep with men in order to impregnate themselves, so that they can spawn demons. The incubi sleep with women to lead them astray and to impregnate them with demon spawn.

[edit] Cultural references
The seven deadly sins have long been a source of inspiration for writers and artists, from morality tales of the Middle Ages to modern manga series and video games.

[edit] Enneagram Integration
The Enneagram of Personality integrates the seven with two additional sins, deceit and fear. The Enneagram descriptions are broader than the traditional Christian interpretation and are presented in a comprehensive map.[12][13]

[edit] Literary works inspired by the seven deadly sins
John Climacus (7th century) in The Ladder of Divine Ascent places victory over the eight thoughts as individual steps of the thirty-step ladder: wrath (8), vainglory (10, 22), sadness (13), gluttony (14), lust (15), greed (16, 17), acedia (18), and pride (23).
Dante's (1265–1321 A.D.) The Divine Comedy is a three-part work composed of "Inferno", "Purgatorio", and "Paradiso". "Inferno" divides Hell into nine concentric circles, four of which directly correspond to some of the deadly sins (Circle 2 to lust, 3 to gluttony, 4 to greed, and 5 to wrath, as well as sloth. The punishment of these two sins take place in the Stygian lake, the wrathful being punished atop the lake, attacking one another with the various members of their person, including fangs.[14]. The slothful are punished underneath the lake breathing sighs in bubbles, singing a dolorous song, as told by Virgil in Canto VII.[15] The remaining circles do not neatly map onto the seven sins. In "Purgatorio", the mountain[clarification needed] is scaled in seven levels and follows the sin sequence of Aquinas (starting with pride).
William Langland's (c. 1332–1386) Vision of Piers Plowman is structured around a series of dreams that are critical of contemporary errors while encouraging godly living. The sins are mentioned in this order: proud (pride; Passus V, lines 62–71), lechour (lecherousness; V. 71–74), envye (envy; V. 75–132), wrathe (wrath; V. 133–185), coveitise (covetousness; V. 186–306), glutton (gluttony; V. 307–385), sleuthe (sloth; V. 386–453) (using the B-text).[clarification needed][1]
John Gower's (1330-1408) Confessio Amantis centres on a confession by Amans ("the Lover") to Genius, the chaplain of the goddess Venus. Following confessional practice of the time, the confession is structured around the seven deadly sins, though focuses on his sins against the rules of courtly love.[2]
Geoffrey Chaucer's (c. 1340–1400) Canterbury Tales features the seven deadly sins in The Parson's Tale: pride (paragraphs 24–29), envy (30–31), wrath (32–54), sloth (55–63), greed (64–70), gluttony (71–74), lust (75–84).[3]
Christopher Marlowe's (1564–1593) The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus shows Lucifer, Beelzebub, and Mephistophiles coming from hell to show Dr. Fastus "some pastime" (Act II, Scene 2). The sins present themselves in order: pride, greed, envy, wrath, gluttony, sloth, lust. [4]
Edmund Spenser's (1552–1599), The Faerie Queene addresses the seven deadly sins in "Book I (The Legend of the Knight of the Red Cross, Holiness)": vanity/pride (Canto IV, stanzas 4–17), idleness/sloth (IV. 18-20), gluttony (IV. 21-23), lechery/lust (IV. 24-26), avarice/greed (IV. 27-29), envy (IV. 30-32), wrath (IV. 33-35). [5]
Garth Nix's "The Keys to the Kingdom" is a seven-book children's series in which the main nemesis of each book is afflicted by one of the seven deadly sins.

[edit] Art and music
Hieronymus Bosch, The Seven Deadly Sins and the Four Last Things (1485).
Kurt Weill and Bertolt Brecht, The Seven Deadly Sins (Die sieben Todsünden) (1933)
Modern artist Paul Cadmus painted a series of graphically disturbing, anthropomorphic depictions of the seven deadly sins, in the style of comic books. After his death, this series was willed to the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
The album Heaven and Hell by Joe Jackson is a modern musical interpretation of the seven deadly sins.
The Tiger Lillies's new album and stage show 7 Deadly Sins is based on the sins being experienced by a modernized version of Punch and Judy (in itself a reworking of Adam and Eve) called "Punch and Jude".
The album Melankolia / XXX Couture by Danish rapper L.O.C. focuses on how the artist came into contact with each of the sins, and then how these sins have come to be culturally accepted.
Kendell Geers, "The Seven Deadly Sins" 2006: Series of 7 Ultra Violet neons exhibited at Stephen Friedman Gallery in London, Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst in Ghent Belgium, DA2 in Salamanca Spain and the 2007 Venice Biennial

[edit] Film, television, radio, comic books and video games
The film The Devil's Nightmare is about a succubus who kills a group of tourists who are each guilty of one of the seven sins.
The original version of the film Bedazzled (1967) (remade in 2000) includes all seven sins, most notably Raquel Welch as lust, Barry Humphries as envy, and Peter Cook as Lucifer, representing pride.
In the film Se7en (1995), directed by David Fincher and starring Brad Pitt and Morgan Freeman, a mysterious serial killer punishes transgressors of each of the deadly sins through his crimes.
In the film Serenity (2005), written and directed by Joss Whedon and starring Nathan Fillion, there are two references to the "seven deadly sins". When The Operative kills the government scientist in the beginning of the movie he tells him that his sin is "pride". Later, when Mal is fighting The Operative, Mal tells him he is "a fan of all seven" (but at the moment, he chooses wrath).
The Magnificent Seven Deadly Sins (1971) is a British film built around a series of comedy sketches on the seven deadly sins, and referencing the classic Western film The Magnificent Seven.
In the video game Overlord, the seven heroes that the protagonist must defeat are based on the seven sins.
The Seven Deadly Sins (traditionally given as "The Seven Deadly Enemies of Man") figure prominently in the mythos of Fawcett/DC Comics superhero Captain Marvel, and have appeared several times as supervillains in recent DC Comics publications.
In the manga and anime Digimon (the Seven Great Demon Lords, each of whom represent one of the sins, are a major group of antagonists); Umineko no Naku Koro ni, the seven deadly sins are represented by the seven Stakes of Purgatory and each of them are named after the devils corresponding to the sin.
In the manga and anime Reborn! the members of the group of assassins Varia are named after each one of the seven deadly sins (such as Superbia Squalo, Superbia meaning pride in Latin; Lussuria, meaning Lust in Italian) or after the demons that represent the sins (such as Mammon and Belphegor)
In the manga and anime Fullmetal Alchemist, each sin is used as the name of each member of a group of powerful false humans called "homunculi", with each homunculi's personality being based on the sin he or she is named after.
In the videogame Devil May Cry 3, the seven deadly sins are represented by a group of common enemies, as well as by seven infernal bells. Fallen angels that personify the sins also feature heavily in the prequel manga, in which they are important in summoning the bell-containing tower in the first place.
In the Philippines TV series Lastikman each major villain represents one of the deadly sins.
In the Norwegian TV show De syv dødssyndene (The Seven Deadly Sins), Christopher Schau attempts to invoke the wrath of God by carrying out each of the seven deadly sins. When Schau was talking about the show on the talk show Senkveld (Late Night), he said "If I don't end up in Hell, then there is no Hell." The program caused a great deal of public debate surrounding the issue of censorship.
In Matt Fraction's comic book Casanova, the series' issues are named, in Latin, for each of the seven sins, beginning with Luxuria.
In the game Rengoku II: The Stairway to Heaven, you go through eight levels of a tower, seven of them being named after each of the Seven Deadly Sins (the other tower is Paradise).
In the webcomic Jack, the seven sins are personified by anthropomorphs.
Comedian Mark Watson examined the seven sins in the first series of the BBC radio show Mark Watson Makes the World Substantially Better. In order to fit the sins into a six part series Greed and Gluttony were combined as the 'similiar sins'.
The American TV show Supernatural references the seven deadly sins and their association with demons throughout all of their 4 seasons.
In World of Warcraft, there are two fist weapons named to reference the seven deadly sins; "Pride" and "Greed".

[edit] References
1.^ Boyle, Marjorie O'Rourke (1997). "Three: The Flying Serpent". Loyola's Acts: The Rhetoric of the Self. (The New Historicism: Studies in Cultural Poetics,. 36). Berkeley: University of California Press. pp. 100–146. ISBN 978-0-520-20937-4. http://ark.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/ft2t1nb1rw/.
2.^ Proverbs 6:16–19
3.^ Galatians
4.^ Refoule, 1967
5.^ Refoule, 1967
6.^ Catechism of the Catholic Church
7.^ Oxford English dictionary
8.^ a b Okholm, Dennis. "Rx for Gluttony". Christianity Today, Vol. 44, No. 10, September 11, 2000, p.62
9.^ "Gluttony". Catholic Encyclopedia. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06590a.htm.
10.^ http://www.sacred-texts.com/chr/aquinas/summa/sum291.htm
11.^ Oxford English dictionary
12.^ Maitri, The Enneagram of Passions and Virtues, pp.11-31
13.^ Rohr, The Enneagram
14.^ see Inferno, Canto VII
15.^ Inferno, Canto VII.120-128, translated by H.F. Cary, courtesy Project Gutenberg
Refoule, F. (1967) Evagrius Ponticus. In Staff of Catholic University of America (Eds.) New Catholic Encyclopaedia. Volume 5, pp644–645. New York: McGrawHill.
Schumacher, Meinolf (2005): "Catalogues of Demons as Catalogues of Vices in Medieval German Literature: 'Des Teufels Netz' and the Alexander Romance by Ulrich von Etzenbach." In In the Garden of Evil: The Vices and Culture in the Middle Ages. Edited by Richard Newhauser, pp. 277–290. Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies.

[edit] See also
The Seven Sins of Memory

[edit] Further reading
The Divine Comedy ("Inferno", "Purgatorio", and "Paradiso"), by Dante Alighieri
Summa Theologica, by Thomas Aquinas
The Concept of Sin, by Josef Pieper
The Traveller's Guide to Hell, by Michael Pauls & Dana Facaros
Sacred Origins of Profound Things, by Charles Panati
The Faerie Queene, by Edmund Spenser
The Seven Deadly Sins Series, Oxford University Press (7 vols.)

 

 

The 7 Heaven's and Earth's Below - David Icke's Official Forums 2 posts - 2 authors - Last post: 10 Feb
The 7 Heaven's and Earth's Below Meditation / Human Consciousness / Spirituality / Ascension / 2012 Mayan Calendar.
www.davidicke.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1058301618 - Similar

 

 

The 7 Heaven's and Earth's Below

This section of the angels story has been given different names by different theologians. It has been called:
- The seven heavens and the 7 hells
- The 7 celestial mansions and the 7 palaces
of darkness
- The 7 heavens and the seven earths.

These would be similar to the lowlands and highlands of our world. The seven heavens stack one over the top of each other in a straight line.

I am presenting this information by combining in order both 7 Heavens & 7 Earths.

The portrayal of the synthesis for - The 7 Heavens - was made by me using as much as possible the information in hand. Steli :-)

 

Seven is the maximum number of eclipses of the Sun and Moon that can occur in any one year.

Luicifer is responsible for bringing all below to above.
__________________
Going around the merry go around is revolution
Been aware of your journey, is evolution

The Seventh Heaven
Araboth
The 7th heaven is the holiest of the holy heavens. Araboth is ruled by Archangel Cassiel and is home to God and his Divine Throne it is also the abode of human souls waiting to be born. It is also home to the highest orders of angels - the Seraphim, Cherubim, and Thrones. It is in the 7th Heaven that Isaiah has a glimpse of God and the Christ and "hears the Most high dictating the program on his (Christs) earthly manifestation and return."

The Seventh Earth
This world's form is very much like that of Earth's, having hills, mountains, valleys and flatlands. Here lies 365 different types of bizarre creatures. These creatures range from having two heads, to having multiple bodies, but are considered to be righteous. They are considered quite superior and live off the aquatic life found there. They have the unique ability to prolong life or bring the dead back to life.

More References
In Enoch 2,8, the Garden of Eden and the Tree of Life are both found in the 3rd Heaven.
The Zohar mentions 390 Heavens and 70,000 worlds.
The gnostic Basilides vouched for 365 Heavens.
Jellenek (in Beth Ha-Midrasch) recalls a legend which tells of 955 Heavens.
In Enoch 2 the Heavens number 10. Here the 8th Heaven is called Muzaloth. The 9th Heaven, home of the 12 signs of the zodiac, is called Kukhavim. The 10th, where Enoch saw the "vision of the face of the Lord", is called Aravoth (Hebrew term for the 12 signs of the Zodiac).
The confusion of the Heavens is clear here from the fact that the signs of the zodiac do not lodge in the Heavens named after them.

The notion of the 7 Heavens appears in The Testament of the Twelve Patriarchs and other Jewish apocrypha, and was familiar to the ancient Persians and Babylonians.
The Persians pictured the Almighty in the highest of the 7 Heavens, "seated on a great white throne, surrounded by winged cherubim."
The Koran also speaks of 7 Heavens.

namaste

 

The 7 Deadly Sins

* Gula (gluttony)
* Fornicatio (fornication, lust)
* Avaritia (avarice/greed)
* Tristitia (sorrow)
* Ira (wrath)
* Acedia (acedia)
* Vanagloria (vainglory)
* Superbia (Pride)

7 colours of light

7 steps from creation to divine

7 steps to heaven

7 realities of existense

7 states of being

 

The 7 Tetragonal crystal classes.

Topologists have been able to prove that 7 colors may be needed on a donut shaped map to ensure that no adjacent areas are the same.

There are seven different ways of linking four hexagons together.

7 is the smallest number of integer-sided rectangles that tile a rectangle so that no 2 rectangles share a common length.

The Chemical Element Nitrogen has an atomic number of 7.

The 7 directions: north, south, east, west, up, down and the center.

In Humans: the 7 Endocrine glands.

The 7 colors of the rainbow.

The 7 double letters of the Hebrew Alphabet.

The 7 classical planets.

The 7 bodies of the Human microcosm.

In Humans: the 7 chakras.

Seventh heaven is the farthest of the concentric spheres containing the stars in the Moslem and cabalist systems.

 

 

movie1.search.biglobe.ne.jp/video/watch/af38f248523e931f - Cached - Similar -lightgiver and the Book of Revelations: - Page 26 - David Icke's ... 10 posts - 2 authors - Last post: 8 Jun
'I'm not telling you up to seven times, I'm telling you up to seventy seven times!' " http://www.973-eht-namuh-973.com/col...s_1_cont_6.htm ...
www.davidicke.com/forum/showthread.php?

Seven

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Seven generation sustainability is an ecological concept that urges the current generation of humans to live sustainably and work for the benefit of the seventh generation into the future.

Our generation, the seventh generation since the Alter Rebbe . . . and this generation (the last generation of the exile) immediately becomes the generation of the Geula .

"In every deliberation, we must consider the impact on the seventh generation... even if it requires having skin as thick as the bark of a pine."

—Great Law of the Iroquois

“Adah and Zillah, hear my voice;
Wives of Lamech, listen to my speech!
For I have killed a man for wounding me,
Even a young man for hurting me.

If Cain shall be avenged sevenfold,
Then Lamech seventy-sevenfold.”

—Genesis 4:19-24 (NKJV)

. Read Genesis 4 and 5 carefully and you'll discover that the full flowering of wickedness or righteousness becomes apparent in the seventh generation from Adam in each respective line.

7th pineal/crown crown Saturn Rosslyn (King of the Grail)

The word chakra is Sanskrit for wheel or disk and signifies one of seven basic energy centers in the body that correspond to nerve ganglia branching out from the spinal column, as well as states of consciousness, developmental stages of life, archetypal elements, body functions, colors, sounds, and much, much more.

7 seals, 7 trumpets, 7 bowls
Seven churches, seven seals, seven trumpets, seven bowls ordered in a big picture. Three great earthquakes and 14 judgments from God.

the seventh "trumpet" is an announcement that the "king" and his kingdom have arrived.

7. The Seventh Bowl

This next judgement is the last and final judgement.

THE SEVENTH SEAL

“And when he had opened the seventh seal, there was silence in heaven about the space of half an hour.” Revelation 8:1.

The 7th seal, remember, has still to be opened. Chapter seven was inserted between the 6th and 7th seals simply because that is when the sealing work will occur in the stream of time. But once the 144,000 are sealed, the four angels standing at the four corners of the earth are allowed to release the four winds which will hurt the earth, the sea and the trees. The hurting of the earth, the sea and the trees is in fact the beginning of the 7th seal.

7 candles of the Menorah

There are seven planets, namely: Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, the Sun, Venus, Mercury and the Moon.

The Seventh Sign is a 1988 film written by Clifford and Ellen Green and directed by Carl Schultz.( The seals have been broken. The prophecies have begun.)

Seven (also marketed as Se7en) is a 1995 American crime film ,(remember the head in the box at the end)could this have represented John the baptist?)

Chapter 7: 144,000 Sealed on Earth and a Throne Scene of Delivered Saints

7th Chakra of the earth, Great Pyramid & Mt Sinai & Mt of Olives Throat Chakra & air Spinner Wheel Egypt Middle East.http://www.earthchakras.org/

"Each of the major cathedrals along the pilgrimage were on ancient sites representing the seven major chakras of Europe.

The sites were:

Cathedral of St. James at Compostela (Moon Oracle) - base chakra
Notre-Dame de Dalbade Tolouse (Mercury Oracle) - sacral chakra
Orleans Cathedral (Venus Oracle) - solar pelxus chakra
Chartres Cathedral ( Sun Oracle) - heart chakra
Notre Dame de Paris (Mars Oracle) - throat chakra
Amiens Cathedral (Jupiter Oracle) - brow chakra
Rosslyn Chapel (Saturn Oracle) - crown chakra" (7,10)

THE SEVEN CHURCHES

Moving to the book of Revelation, we find letters to seven churches in Asia Minor. These seven churches, while they were literal congregations, they are also understood to be a description of a spectrum of seven conditions any church can find itself in. They are also considered symbolic for seven consecutive periods of time, from the Apostolic church to the time of the second coming as follows:

Ephesus ("desirable"), Rev. 2:1-7 — The Apostolic church of the 1st century.
Smyrna ("sweet smelling"), Rev. 2:8-11 — Persecuted by Ancient Pagan Rome.
Pergamos ("elevated by marriage"), Rev. 2:12-17 — Apostate church-state union.
Thyatira ("sacrifice of contrition"), Rev. 2:18-29 — The church of the middle ages.
Sardis ("escape of the remnant"), Rev. 3:1-6 — The Reformation era.
Philadelphia ("brotherly love"), Rev. 3:7-13 — The early 19th century to 1844.
Laodicea ("a people judged"), Rev. 3:14-19 — From 1844 to the second coming.

Knight of the Eagle and Pelican is one of the titles applied to a Rose-Croix ...... The number 7 is the sacred number in all theogo- nies and in all symbolisms. ..... the keystone of the Temple, the symbol of occult Ma- sonry ; — the cross, that central .... Mithra, it was said in the ancient Sabean Mysteries,

7/7 ripple effect

7 days in a week

More to come,there is a lot more to it.

 


__________________
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha

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In astronomy, the Pleiades, or seven sisters, (Messier object 45) are an open star cluster in the constellation of Taurus. It is among the nearest star clusters to Earth and is the cluster most obvious to the naked eye in the night sky. Pleiades has several meanings in different cultures and traditions.

The cluster is dominated by hot blue stars that have formed within the last 100 million years. Dust that forms a faint reflection nebulosity around the brightest stars was thought at first to be left over from the formation of the cluster (hence the alternate name Maia Nebula after the star Maia), but is now known to be an unrelated dust cloud in the interstellar medium that the stars are currently passing through. Astronomers estimate that the cluster will survive for about another 250 million years, after which it will disperse due to gravitational interactions with its galactic neighbourhood.

The Babylonian star catalogues name them MUL.MUL or "star of stars", and they head the list of stars along the ecliptic, reflecting the fact that they were close to the point of vernal equinox around the 23rd century BC. Some Greek astronomers considered them to be a distinct constellation, and they are mentioned by Hesiod, and in Homer's Iliad and Odyssey. They are also mentioned three times in the Bible (Job 9:9 and 38:31, as well as Amos 5:8). The Pleiades (Krittika) are particularly revered in Hindu mythology as the six mothers of the war god Skanda, who developed six faces, one for each of them. Some scholars of Islam suggested that the Pleiades (Al thuraiya) are the Star in Najm which is mentioned in the Quran.

I sometimes wish someone else had started this thread,I am getting an aversion to the term Grand secretary,it should be petite secretary.

The Stargate Conspiracy: The Truth about Extraterrestrial life and the Mysteries of Ancient Egypt

In recent years, alternative historians have gained remarkable insight into the mysteries of ancient Egypt-but according to Lynn Picknett and Clive Prince, their discoveries tie into a dangerous conspiracy nearly fifty years in the making.

At the centre of this conspiracy is a group of respected, powerful individuals who believe that the ancient Egyptian gods are real extraterrestrials who will soon return to earth. The conspirators have intimate and exclusive knowledge of this momentous second coming-but they insist on keeping it to themselves. In this riveting, well-researched book, Picknett and Price reveal what this conspiracy means for the rest of mankind-and expose the insidious motivations of the individuals and organizations behind it...

The Greys were bugging me this morning while I slept,yeah 3 to 4 foot with their little probes and Needles.

The notion of an intellectual elite as a distinguished social stratum can be traced far back in history. Examples are the philosopher-kings and guardians of Plato's Republic and monks in medieval Europe, who are now seen as custodians of history and culture.

Their well-conceived United Religions Initiative will become a powerful tool to influence the masses toward their desired globalist agenda through a syncretic theology, which rabidly opposes religions, which do not conform to their syncretic doctrines, labelling them as intransigent and intolerant, narrow-minded bigots.

and on the 7 th day God took a break.

The Sirius Mystery - Robert Temple
Our own planet Earth is, significantly, 'the place where Ogo's umbilical cord was ..... When the seventh year comes round, a kind of trident is drawn on the outside ...... And near Knossos is a site called Omphalos which is one degree of ...... which is called 'path of the Nommo'.18 He is guardian of the 'spiritual

http://www.scribd.com/doc/2045191/Th...-Robert-Temple

'I'm not telling you up to seven times, I'm telling you up to seventy seven times!' "

http://www.973-eht-namuh-973.com/col...s_1_cont_6.htm

The Illuminati and the Masonic "G":

7 = 3+4 = C+T = G

http://illuminatusobservor.blogspot....masonic-g.html

In Morals and Dogma, Albert Pike writes that Sirius was "the inventor of language, grammar, ... to the second degree in Masonry, whilst the seventh initiation makes the Adept a Master Mason of the Brotherhood of Sirius. ...

http://www.whale.to/b/melanson.html

seventh degree Melchizedek Ambassador of Light. http://www.waking-up.com/issue001/service.html

Noble Realms / The Matrix built by Sirians ? Sirius Serious ?:

 

 

1,2,3,4: Pythagoras and the Cosmology of Number
... to multiplicity via duality and trinity, is expressed even more graphically in ... Michell, The Dimensions of Paradise: The Proportions and Symbolic Numbers of ...
vedicmaths.org/Free Resources/Articles/1234_pythagoras.asp - Cached

 

Free Resources
1,2,3,4: PYTHAGORAS


1,2,3,4: PYTHAGORAS AND THE COSMOLOGY OF NUMBER

At the heart of vedic mathematics lies a principle that underscores most, if not all, of the ancient wisdom traditions, the conveying of knowledge through cryptic, highly compressed expressions, open to multiple levels of interpretation. A prime example of this is the teaching of the Greek mathematician and sage Pythagoras. According to his ancient biographers:

"In the Pythagorean school, knowledge was transmitted symbolically, through the use of cryptic statements and riddles, in which a small number of words was pregnant with multiple levels of interpretation. Students were required to find meaning in these enigmatic lessons, sometimes through questioning and dialogue, sometimes by meditating upon their many possible meanings." (1)

If this was true of Pythagorean teachings, it was even more significant in more ancient schools of knowledge; it was, after all, at these schools, in Egypt, Babylon, and elsewhere, that Pythagoras gained his knowledge. In the case of the Indian tradition, both in Vedic times and later in the Hindu and Buddhist periods, the term most commonly encountered for this kind of cryptic literature was the sutra or collection of sutras. While this is often translated as "aphorism," or "formula," the word comes from the Sanskrit root for "thread," a usage that persists in the modern word "suture." As doctors use sutures to sow us up after surgery, the ancient sutras tie together our knowledge and integrate our awareness. There is no better example than the teachings contained in Patanjali's Yoga Sutras whose terse expressions contain instructions for the development of higher states of consciousness. Similarly, all the principles of vedic mathematics are encapsulated in sixteen sutras, which, along with thirteen sub-sutras, provide the basis for all the operations described in "The Cosmic Computer" (2).
If vedic mathematics can be counted as part of vedic literature, its ultimate source is the Rg Veda. This is certainly not concise, consisting of over 10,000 verses, but, as His Holiness Maharishi Mahesh Yogi has explained, it has a unique structure in which the essence of the whole text is essentially contained in one highly compressed expression--its first word. "It is the purpose of all ciphers to invest a few signs with much meaning," Carlo Suarès tells us. "In the severity of its beginning, in its first chapter, in its first sequence of letter numbers, is the seed, and in the seed is the whole." (3)
Suarès is referring to the beginning of Genesis, in which the process of creation is described, using the symbolism of gematria, in which each letter is given a numerical value. (4) According to Maharishi, the Rg Veda also sets forth a cosmogony in its first word-- Agni, but using a purely linguistic symbolism based on the physiology of speech. The first letter, or sound, AAAAAA…, pronounced with the mouth and throat fully open, and thus with a fully open sound, represents the fullness of the unmanifest, unbounded Brahman. But the letter G, a full glottal stop, introduces the first boundary on the full openness of the sound AAAAAA…. As the wave value of a sub-atomic particle collapses onto a point value when observed, so the unity, or samhita, value of Brahman collapses onto a point and becomes the triadic value of rishi, devata and chhandas, observer, process of observing, and object of observation. From here the process of manifestation begins. As the full stream of manifestation emerges, it leads on to the fullness of creation, and this is represented by the syllable NI, the same name given to the leading tone in Indian music (Sa, Re, Ga, Me Pa, Dha, Ni.....). The details of the process, and the content of manifestation and evolution, are unfolded through the rest of the verses of Rg Veda and commented upon by the rest of Vedic literature, including vedic mathematics.
Unity, duality, diversity, wholeness. These are the mechanics of creation described in different symbolic formulations in different knowledge traditions. To find it in purely mathematical or numerical form we return to the Pythagorean tradition, and its most concise expression comes from his successor Plato. Considered the most Pythagorean of Platonic dialogues, the Timaeus begins with a question by Socrates: "One, two, three ? but where, my dear Timaeus, is the fourth of my guests of yesterday who were to entertain me today?" (5) Commentators usually ignore this statement, but, as we have seen, in ancient literature every expression is "pregnant with multiple levels of meaning." This is particularly true when dealing with numbers.

"He [Pythagoras] held that the ultimate substances of all things, material and immaterial, were numbers, which had two distinct and complimentary aspects. On the one hand, they had a spatial and dynamic existence, and, on the other, they were fundamental formulating principles which were purely abstract. Thus, for example, the monad was understood by the Pythagoreans both as the number one, which had physical properties that could be manipulated in nature, and as an idea, which embodied the original unity at the source of all creation." (6)

The fundamental formulating principles in the universe are those values of unity, duality, diversity and wholeness we have already encountered. In Pythagorean thought these principles are clearly expressed in the first four numbers. Furthermore, this symbolism can be interpreted in terms of the Quadrivium, the four Pythagorean mathematical disciplines: arithmetic, music, geometry and astronomy.
Arithmetic was seen as the study of the abstract essence of things. Thus each number had a cosmological, as well as mathematical, significance. The monad, manifest as the number one, denotes the primordial unity at the basis of creation. The transition from one to two, from the monad to the dyad, represents the first step in the process of creation--unity polarizing within itself becomes duality. Three, the triad, is the first true number. One contains the seed, and two introduces potential. Three brings number into being, causing the potential contained within the monad to manifest into its true expression, the world of plurality and multitude.
If one and two initiate creation, three and four complete the process. Therefore, the tetrad, four, represents completion. Everything in the universe, both natural and numerical, is completed in the progression from one to four as 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 = 10, which brings us to the decad, also known to the Pythagoreans as the tetraktys, and representing their most sacred symbol. The same sequence, from unity to multiplicity via duality and trinity, is expressed even more graphically in the simplest and most basic musical relationships, those expressed through the numbers 1,2,3,4. The simplest and most fundamental musical relationship is the octave, discovered by Pythagoras to be the 1:2 relationship, and by Joseph Saveur (1653-1716) many centuries later, to be the first relationship in the harmonic overtone series. The experience of the octave is of two notes that are the same and yet different, and these values, sameness and difference are the fundamental substances used by the Demiurge to create the World-Soul in the Timaeus. Further, the octave provides the boundary conditions within which the musical universes contained within scales are formed, the values of Do in Do, Re, Mi, Fa, So, La, Ti, Do. Of these intervals, the central ones are those found to be next in the overtone series, 2:3, known as the fifth and 3:4 known as the fourth. These values are found in the first four harmonics of the overtone series, first 1:2 (octave), then 2:3 (fifth) then 3:4 (fourth) recapitulating the octave at the next power of two. In four simple sounds the whole process of unity, duality, multiplicity and wholeness is presented to the awareness.
In subsequent centuries, the science of geometry was developed into a sacred form in which the same process is represented by the circle (unity), contrasted with the square (diversity), and reconciled in the squaring of the circle, in alchemical practice, and the development of the mandala in Eastern art and architecture. "The object of sacred geometry being to depict that fusion of opposites, the squared circle is therefore its first symbol. Temples and cosmological cities throughout antiquity were founded on its proportions." (7) For Pythagoras, the symbolism of wholeness (kosmos) and order (harmonia) extended beyond mathematical to astrological phenomena. A theoretical planet called the counter-earth was posited to bring the number of heavenly bodies in the Pythagorean firmament to ten, the perfect number, the number of the tetraktys. And over time, an association between planets and musical notes was developed and elaborated into the famous "music of the spheres," a beautiful image of the kosmos as a divine harmony.
Having seen its range of implications, it could almost be stated that the sequence 1,2,3,4 sums up, in a compressed symbolism, the whole range of Pythagoreanism. But if we delve deeper into Platonic thought, a further dimension is revealed. In one of his most potent allegories, known as the "Divided Line," Plato sets out his theories of ontology and epistemology, and again it is done in terms of the number four. In this analogy, Plato makes a distinction between the outer realm of the world, illuminated by the sun and the inner realm of the mind, illuminated by the Good. The Divided Line passage divides each of these realms into two further sections. Plato also deals with the state of mind in which the resultant four realms are apprehended, resulting in the following scheme:

Level Object Faculty Type of Knowledge

IV Forms dialectic transcendental cognition } internal III mathematics thinking, scientific understanding } world Etc. reasoning

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

II physical sense common-sense belief } external objects perception } world I shadows illusory illusion (8) perception

It can be seen from this scheme that within the subjective realm of the mind, Plato posits a level of knowledge higher than that which deals with mathematical objects through the processes of thinking and reasoning. This is the level of the forms and it is reached, Plato tells us, through the use of the "second phase" of the dialectic, a technique that, according to Jonathan Shear is similar to the practice of jñana yoga. (9) This again reflects the Pythagorean approach to mathematics, one that must, on some level at least, apply to vedic maths also:

"For Pythagoras, mathematics served as a bridge between the visible and invisible worlds. He pursued the discipline of mathematics not only as a way of understanding and manipulating nature, but also as a means of turning the mind away from the physical world, which he held to be transitory and unreal, and leading it to the contemplation of eternal and truly existing things that never vary. He taught his students that by focusing on the elements of mathematics, they could calm and purify the mind, and ultimately, through disciplined effort, experience true happiness." (10)

Notes:

(1) John Strohmeier and Peter Westbrook. Divine Harmony: The Life and Teachings of Pythagoras. (Berkeley, CA: Berkeley Hills Books, 1999), p. 54.
(2) Williams and Gaskell, The Cosmic Computer (Inspiration Books, 1997.
(3) Carlo Suarès The Cipher of Genesis (York Beach, Maine: Samuel Weiser, Inc., 1992), p. 72.
(4) For more information on gematria see John Michell, The New View Over Atlantis (London: Thames & Hudson Ltd., 1983) and Gordon Strachan, Jesus the Master Builder: Druid Mysteries and the Dawn of Christianity. (Edinburgh: Floris Books, 1998).
(5) Plato, Timaeus, 17a.
(6) Strohmeier & Westbrook (1999), p. 66.
(7) John Michell, The Dimensions of Paradise: The Proportions and Symbolic Numbers of Ancient Cosmology (San Francisco: Harper & Row, 1988), pp. 66-67.
(8) Jonathan Shear, The Inner Dimension: Philosophy and the Experience of Consciousness (New York: Peter Lang, 1990), p. 12, n2.
(9) It is interesting note that the Greek word harmonia has a similar etymology to the Sanskrit yoga, viz. a joining together of opposite values.
(10) Strohmeier & Westbrook (1999), p. 66

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HOLY BIBLE

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Alphabetics Commentary on "Immanuel" -- God with us
The word Immanuel/Emmanuel means, "God with us." It conveys the idea of God come down in the flesh, mingling alongside mankind, subject to their brutality, ...
www.greaterthings.com/Word-Number/Immanuel.htm

Immanuel

Introduction

The word Immanuel/Emmanuel means, "God with us." It conveys the idea of God come down in the flesh, mingling alongside mankind, subject to their brutality, while extending his love in bringing their redemption.

Looking at the words before and after Immanuel/Emmanuel in Hebrew, Greek and English sheds interesting light on the word as it applies both to the first Messianic advent among the Jews as well as the second Messianic advent among the Gentiles.

KEY:
The following quotations come from the texts indicated. Editorial/explanatory comments are enclosed in [brackets].

Words Around "Immanuel" in Zodhiates' NT Greek Lexicon

1690 embrimaomai To be enraged, indignant, to express indignation against someone; to murmur against, blame. [The Jews were ticked off at Jesus.]
Syn. (2008), to admonish, adjudge, find fault with, rebuke; (4727), to groan, grieve; (1111), to mutter, murmur, grumble. [So typical of the Lord's people toward his work in their midst.]
Ant. (2106), to aprove; (4909), to consent in full approval

1691 eme The emphatic form of me (3165), I, me, myself. [e.g. God himself -- exclamation point!]

1692 emeo To spit out, vomit. [How the Jews and Gentiles receive their Messiah.]
Syn. ptuo (4429), to spit.
Ant. eisdechomai (1523), to receive, take into one's favor.

1693 emmainomai To be mad or furious with or against any person or thing.
Syn. (3912), to be insane, a fool [801]
Ant. (366), to come to one's senses [a nation shall be born in a day]; (1852), metaphorically to awake out of sleep, to be aware of one's actions.

> 1694 Emmanouel Proper noun transliterated from the Hebrew Immanu'el (6005, OT), God with us.

1695 Emmaous Emmaus. [Resurrected Christ walking in the midst and talking with two disciples who did not recognize him.]

1696 Emmeno To remain, persever in. [(1) to dwell with--Immanuel; (2) Fits the idea of Emmaus, when the disciples said to Jesus, "Abide with me, 'tis eventide."]
Syn. (1961), to continue in; (1265), to stay through.
Ant. (720), to deny, reounce; (3868), to give up, avoid, reject.

1697 Emmor from Hebr. Chamor, An ass. [play on words, depicting how man views those who do the work of God, including God himself, in their midst]

1698 Emoi I, me, mine, my. [God himself.]

1699 Emoi I, mine, my own. [God himself.]

1700 Emou Of me, mine, my. [God himself.]

1701 empaigmos Derision, scoffing, mocking. [e.g. Is how the Jews received Christ, their very God come to dwell in their midst in the flesh.]

1702 empaizo To deride, mock, scoff at. Empaizo is used in the Synoptic Gospels of the mockery of Christ . . . . The word is used prophetically by the Lord of His impending sufferings and of the insults actually inflicted upon Him by the men who were taking Him from Gethsemane; by Herod and his soldiers; by the soliers of the governor; by the chief priests, scribes, and elders.

1703 empaiktes A mocker, scoffer, spoken of impostors, false prophets. [Jesus accused of being a false Messiah, sent to deceive the people.]

1704 emperipateo To walk about in a place, e.g., the earth. Used metaphorically, meaning to walk or live among a people, be habitually conversant with. [Immanuel--God with us.]

1705 empiplemi and empiplao To fill, to fill in or up, to make full. In the NT spoken . . . of food, to fill with food, satisfy, satiate, to fill in regard to one's desire with good. Metaphorically in the pss., to be filled with any person or thing, meaning to enjoy the society or communion of someone. [Immanuel--God with us.]

1706 empipto To fall in. Followed by eis (1519), into, with acc. of place, to fall into. Of persons, to fallin with or among, to meet with. Metaphorically, to fallinto any state or condition, to come into. [The condescension of God: Immanuel--God with us.]

1707 empleko To braid in, interweave, entangle, implicate. [God in our midst, subject to the same rigors and circumstances as are we, hence able to intercede on our behalf.]

Words Around "Immanuel" in OT Hebrew Lexicon

The words alphabetically surrounding the Hebrew word for "Immanuel" in the Old Testament Lexicon (Gesenius) further elaborate on the idea of Immanuel: God with us.

What is particularly amazing about this series of words is that they contain all of the major elements of Jacob 5:72, which is a key scripture pointing to not just an Immanuel advent of Jesus Christ among the Jews anciently, but of an Immanuel advent among the Gentile husbandmen of the vineyard in these last days.

Jacob 5:72 reads:

"And it came to pass that the servants did go and labor with their mights; and the Lord of the vineyard labored also with them . . . "

It is important to note that in the sequence of Zenos allegory (Jacob 5), this is right toward the end, when the final thrust is made to salvage a corrupt vineyard. The first are gathered last, the last, first. The branches bringing forth the most bitter fruit are removed, as good branches are grafted in. This is not talking about Jesus coming among the Jews anciently, but rather is referring to these last days. It is our day to which the scripture is referring when it says, "the Lord of the vineyard labored also with them." Immanuel. God with us.

"And thus will I bring them together again, that they shall bring forth the natural fruit, and they shall be one" (Jacob 5:68.)

With this verse and its context in mind now, consider the following series of words in the Old Testament Lexicon, surrounding the word for Immanuel. Again, my comments are in [small brackets].

5994 deep, figuratively hidden, not to be searched out. [Preface to Jacob 5 reads: ". . . how is it possible that these, after having rejected the sure foundation, can ever build upon it, that it may become the head of their corner? Behold, my beloved brethren, I will unfold this mystery unto you . . ." (4:17,18.)]

5995 a sheaf (a bundle of corn[grain]) [(1) similar to vineyard symbolism; (2) sheaf as metaphor for gathering/dividing wheat & tares; (3) corn as code for Messiah]

5996 "servant of the Almighty" [servant, greatest of all]

5997 (1) fellowhip, i.e. my fellow, companion [the Lord of the vineyard labors along side them]; (2) a neighbour [in our midst]

5998 To labour [by our side, in our midst]

5999, 6000 (1) heavy, wearisome labour; (2) the produce of labour; (3) weariness, trouble, vexation; Isa. 53:11.

6004 (1) to gather together, to collect, to join together. [the mission of Immanuel.] (2) to shut, to close, hence to hide, to conceal; to be hidden. [veiled in the flesh.]

> 6005 Immanuel

6006 to take up, to lift, e.g. a stone [(1) after rejecting it, the stone becomes the head stone of their corner (Jacob 4:17); (2) "he (the Stone) shall be exalted and extolled, and be very high" (Isa. 52:13)]

6007 "whom Jehovah carries in his bosom" [(1) "in the shadow of his hand hath he hid me" (Isa. 49:2); (2) For ye are lawful heirs, according to the flesh, and have been hid from the world with Christ in God" (D&C 86:9.)]

6008 "eternal people" [people of God: Israel, Gentiles; first shall be last, last shall be first (Jacob 5)]

6009 To be deep, to be unsearchable. ["I will unfold this mystery unto you" (Jacob 4:18)]

Words Around "Immanuel" in the English Dictionary (Web. '71)

Again, my comments are in [small brackets].

imbrue To soak or drench in a fluid, as in blood. [e.g. Jesus Christ crucified by his own people, that all might have access to his grace.]

imbrute To degrade to the state of a brute. [God condescends to be born into the flesh, which is subject to corruption, in order to show that we, like him, can overcome the brute flesh.]

imbue To soak, steep, or tinge deeply; fig. to inspire, impress, or impregnate (the mind); to cause to become impressed or penetrated. [(1) by coming in the flesh, God is able to understand our struggles; (2) realizing God has done this for us has a strong power to deeply impress our souls on many counts]

imitate To follow as a model, pattern, or example, to copy or endeavour to copy in acts, manners, or otherwise. ["What manner of men ought ye to be? even as I am."]

immaculate Spotless, pure; unstained, undefiled; without blemish [contrast "sterling: exceptional purity," e.g. sterling silver = 92.5% silver; 7.5% tin; e.g. the approximate "A" grade cut-off point: 92.5%]

immanent Remaining in or within [i.e. in our midst: God with us]; hence, not passing out of the subject; inherent and indwelling [e.g. Holy Ghost: God with us]; internal or subjective.

> Immanuel God with us: an appellation of the Saviour immaterial

Not consisting of matter; incorporeal; spiritual [opposite of Immanuel: God in the flesh];
of no essential consequence ["He hath no form nor comeliness; and when we shall see him, there is no beauty that we should desire him." (Isa. 53:2.)];
unimportant [e.g. useless = meaning of word 888 in Greek NT lexicon. The numeric sum of the letters that spell "Jesus" in Greek total 888. See Jesus 888 = Christ 1480 and 888 and 'Without Hands']

Words Around "Emmanuel" in the English Dictionary

 

"The word Immanuel/Emmanuel means, "God with us." It conveys the idea of God come down in the flesh, mingling alongside mankind, subject to their brutality, while extending his love in bringing their redemption."

 

 

GOD WITH US AND US WITH GOD

 

 

HALLELUJAH HURRAH FOR RAH FOR RAH HURRAH HALLELUJAH

 

 

EGYPTIAN CHRONOLOGY

THE MYTHIC DYNASTIES

F. G. Fleay

1899

Page 93

GODS MEMPHITE SCHEME

"PTAH reigned for 9000 months"

 

 

Min-Horus: Min is god of male potency, here combined with Horus god of kingship. the great goddess, lady of Punt: possibly Ipy, the goddess of childbirth ...www.geocities.com/jennycarrington/JJSinuhe/comments.html

Section 38

Min-Horus: Min is god of male potency, here combined with Horus god of kingship.

 

 

The Eye of Horus (Wedjat) (previously Wadjet and the Eye of the Moon; and afterwards ... The Wedjat or Eye of Horus is "the central element" of seven "gold, ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eye_of_Horus

 

Eye of Horus
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The Wedjat - later called The Eye of Horus
An Eye of Horus or Wedjat pendantThe Eye of Horus (Wedjat)[1] (previously Wadjet and the Eye of the Moon; and afterwards as The Eye of Ra)[2] or ("Udjat")[3] is an ancient Egyptian symbol of protection and royal power from deities, in this case from Horus or Ra. The symbol is seen on images of Horus' mother, Isis, and on other deities associated with her.

In the Egyptian language, the word for this symbol was "Wedjat".[4][5] It was the eye of one of the earliest of Egyptian deities, Wadjet, who later became associated with Bast, Mut, and Hathor as well. Wedjat was a solar deity and this symbol began as her eye, an all seeing eye. In early artwork, Hathor is also depicted with this eye.[1] Funerary amulets were often made in the shape of the Eye of Horus. The Wedjat or Eye of Horus is "the central element" of seven "gold, faience, carnelian and lapis lazuli" bracelets found on the mummy of Shoshenq II.[6] The Wedjat "was intended to protect the king [here] in the afterlife"[7] and to ward off evil. Ancient Egyptian and Near Eastern sailors would frequently paint the symbol on the bow of their vessel to ensure safe sea travel. [8]

Contents [hide]
1 Horus
2 Eye of Horus, a hieroglyph and symbol
3 In arithmetic
4 See also
5 References

[edit] Horus
Horus was an ancient Egyptian sky god known as Ra and was pictured in the form of a falcon. The right eye represents a Peregrine Falcon's eye and the markings around it, that includes the "teardrop" marking sometimes found below the eye. As the wedjet (also udjat or utchat), it also represented the sun, and was associated with Horus' mother, Isis, and with wedjet another goddess, as well as the sun deity Ra. The mirror image, or left eye, sometimes represented the moon and the god Djehuti (Thoth).[9]

wedjet - Eye of Horus
in hieroglyphs

[edit] Eye of Horus, a hieroglyph and symbol
Seven different hieroglyphs are used to represent the "eye"-(human body parts). One is the common usage of the verb: to do, make, or perform. The other frequently used hieroglyph is the Wedjat, a sacred eye symbol that gives a mummy the ability "to see again", called the Eye of Horus after his cult rose to prominence as the son of Hathor.

[edit] In arithmetic

Hathor, mother of Horus and later wife of Ra, showing her sacred eye inherited from Wedjat - depicted in the Papyrus of AniIn the Ancient Egyptian measurement system, the Eye Of Horus defined an Old Kingdom rounded off number one (1) = 1/2 + 1/4 + 1/8 + 1/16 + 1/32 + 1/64, by throwing away 1/64. The Eye of Horus statements created 6-term rounded off numbers. The Old Kingdom definition had dropped a 7th term, a remainder 1/64, that was needed to report exact series. During the Middle Kingdom that included the eleventh through fourteenth dynasties, exact series definitions and applications were written by creating 7-terms, or more, written as Egyptian fraction series, often scaled to 1/320 hekat. For example, the Egyptian Mathematical Leather Roll, the RMP 2/n table and the Akhmim Wooden Tablet wrote quotients and Egyptian fraction remainders that solved the problem. The metaphorical side of this information linked the Old Kingdom six fractions, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32, and 1/64 to separate parts of the eye, as noted by:

1/2 was represented by smell, symbolized by the right side of the eye in a form of the nose. The pyramid text says: "Behold [the fire] rises in Abydos and it comes; I cause it to come, the Eye of Horus. It is set in order upon thy brow, O Osiris Khenti-Amenti; it is set in the shrine and rises on thy brow."
1/4 was represented by sight or the sensation of light, symbolized by the pupil. The pyramid text says: "Perfect is the Eye of Horus. I have delivered the Eye of Horus, the shining one, the ornament of the Eye of Ra, the Father of the Gods."
1/8 was represented by thought, symbolized by the eyebrow. The pyramid text says: "...the Eye of Horus hath made me holy...I will hide myself among you, O ye stars which are imperishable. My brow is the brow of Ra."
1/16 was represented by hearing, symbolized by the left side of the eye in the form of an arrow pointing towards the ear. The pyramid text says: "That which has been shut fast/dead hath been opened by the command of the Eye of Horus, which hath delivered me. Established are the beauties on the forehead of Ra."
1/32 was represented by taste, by the sprouting of wheat or grain from the planted stalk, symbolized by a curved tail. The pyramid text says: "Come, the Eye of Horus hath delivered for me my soul, my ornaments are established on the brow of Ra. Light is on the faces of those who are in the members of Osiris."
1/64 was represented by touch, symbolized by a leg touching the ground, or what can also be thought of as a strong plant growing into the surface of the earth. The pyramid text says: "I shall see the Gods and the Eye of Horus burning with fire before my eyes!"

Earthenware Wedjat amulet on display at the Louvre, c. 500–300 BCIn the Middle Kingdom the 1/64 symbol denoted 'rest' and 'healing' as connected to the hekat, with the word dja being attached.

The 'Eye of Horus' fractions were further discussed in the Egyptian Mathematical Leather Roll following elementary definitions that built the Egyptian fraction system. Weights and measure subunits of a hekat were also connected to Eye of Horus numbers in the quotient, and as an exact remainder, the remainder including an Egyptian fraction and a ro unit, correcting the Eye of Horus 1/64 round off error. The ro unit, 1/320 of a hekat is cited in the Rhind Mathematical Papyrus and applied in the medical texts, i.e Ebers Papyrus in two ways. The first replaced the hekat by a unity, 64/64 (in RMP 47, 82 and 83), and the second by 320 ro (in RMP 35-38). Exact divisions of 64/64 by 3, 7, 10, 11 and 13, written as 1/3, 1/17, 1/10, 1/11 and 1/13 multipliers is also found in the Akhmim Wooden Tablet.

Arithmetic values
Wooden case
Faience vessel, Bes holding Eyes

[edit] See also
Evil eye - a widely distributed element of folklore
Eye of Providence: a symbol showing an eye surrounded by rays of light or a glory, and usually enclosed by a triangle

[edit] References
Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Eye of Horus

1.^ Chapter 14, Egyptian Art in David P. Silverman, Ancient Egypt, Duncan Baird Publishers, 1997. p.228
2.^ Wörterbuch der ägyptischen Sprache 1, 268.13
3.^ Alessandro Bongioanni & Maria Croce (ed.), The Treasures of Ancient Egypt: From the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, Universe Publishing, a division of Ruzzoli Publications Inc., 2003. p.622 According to the editors, 'Udjat' was the term for amulets which used Eye of Horus design.
4.^ Pommerening, Tanja, Die altägyptischen Hohlmaße (Studien zur Altägyptischen Kultur, Beiheft 10), Hamburg, Helmut Buske Verlag, 2005
5.^ M. Stokstad, "Art History"
6.^ Silverman, op. cit., p.228
7.^ Silverman, op. cit., p.228
8.^ Charles Freeman, The Legacy of Ancient Egypt, Facts on File, Inc. 1997. p.91
9.^ Eye of Horus, Eye of Ra (Udjat, Wedjet)
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eye_of_Horus"
Categories: Ancient Egyptian culture | Ancient Egyptian society | Egyptian fractions | Elementary arithmetic | Eye | Hieroglyphs | Egyptian hieroglyphs-Gardiner listed

 

 

YEA

THOUGH I WALK THROUGH

THE

VALLEY OF THE SHADOW OF DEATH

I

WILL FEAR NO EVIL FOR THOU ART WITH

ME

 

 

JUST SIX NUMBERS

Martin Rees

1
999

OUR COSMIC HABITAT

PLANETS STARS AND LIFE

Page 24

A

proton

is

1,836 times heavier than an electron, and the number 1,836

would have the same connotations to any 'intelligence'

 

 

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kjvstrongs/STRHEB8.htm - Cached - SimilarAll Greek to me!
ishshah - This is the Hebrew word for woman. Since there is no definite article, ... Note that the condition "mishkevey 'ishshah" (whatever it means) is not ... www.geocities.com/pharsea/Leviticus.html

 

Full text of "Osiris and the Egyptian resurrection; illustrated ...
Horus his son driving a spear into his face, to open his mouth and his two eyes. ...... 27) the deceased says that the god is equipped and that he is equipped ...... maketh entreaty, his name becometh Aku-ta. Thou dost suppress Set. ...
www.archive.org/stream/.../osirisandtheeg02budguoft_djvu.txt

 

Osiris and the Egyptian resurrection - Google Books Result
by Ernest Alfred Wallis Budge - 1973 - History - 439 pages
When thou didst say, Set, "... those who acclaim," his name became that of Aku-ta. When thou didst say, Set, " . . those who journey," his name became that ...books.google.com/books?isbn

 

Full text of "...The Egyptian heaven and hell"
A company of nine serpents, each of which belches fire from its mouth and is .... formed by the body of a monster serpent called Ankh-aeu-tchefau-axkh-aku, ...... shall be a spirit well equipped " both in heaven and earth, unfailingly, ...
www.archive.org/.../theegyptianheave01budgiala/theegyptianheave01budgiala_djvu.txt

 

The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria by Theophilus G. Pinches ...
Of equal antiquity with the religion of Egypt, that of Babylonia and .... at the mouth of the rivers." The hero Gilgameš, on the other hand, was half divine by birth, ..... other terrible beings, were created and equipped, the whole being ...... regarded as occurring in the name of the Babylonian king Eri-Aku, ...
www.fullbooks.com/The-Religion-of-Babylonia-and-Assyria.html

 

The Ismaili News
Equipped with some of the most powerful technologies of our age, .... Shiraz shines in AKU Staff triumph · پاکستانی طالبعلم بابراقبال نے چوتھا عالمی ریکارڈ ...
ahmadladhani.wordpress.com/page/14/?ref=herseybedava.

 

 

QI - Series C - Cleve Crudgington - British Comedy Guide
Other examples include the River Tyne (River River) Paraguay River (River River River) and Sahara Desert (Desert Desert). "Boutros Boutros-Ghali" means ...
www.comedy.org.uk/guide/tv/qi/episodes

- Torpenhow Hill is twice as interesting a Mount Fuji, because "Torpenhow Hill" means "Hill Hill Hill Hill", whilst "Mount Fuji" is just "Hill Hill". They are tautological place names. Other examples include the River Tyne (River River) Paraguay River (River River River) and Sahara Desert (Desert Desert). "Boutros Boutros-Ghali" means "Peter Peter-Expensive". Correction: The hill in question is just "Torpenhow", not "Torpenhow Hill". Therefore, it is "Hill Hill Hill".

 

Nothingness « Everybody lies…
Then there are rivers, like the River Aven, River Ax, River Ax and more rivers that all mean “river river”. Paraguay River means “river river river” and ...
ingas.wordpress.com/category/nothingness/ - Cached - Similar


Everybody lies…
Then there are rivers, like the River Aven, River Ax, River Ax and more rivers that all mean “river river”. Paraguay River means “river river river” and ...
ingas.wordpress.com/page/2/ - Cached - Similar


River Paraguay - TheBestLinks.com - Paraguay River, Argentina ...
Paraguay River, River Paraguay, Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Desert, National ... Print friendly version | Tell a friend ...
www.thebestlinks.com/Paraguay_River.html - Similar

 

 

World Wide Words: Abracadabra
19 Dec 2005 ... The origin of the mystical phrase 'abracadabra', much beloved of conjurors, is explained.
www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-abr1.htm

 

[Q] From Speranza Spiratos: Can you shed some magical clarity on the word abracadabra please?

[A] Let me wave my wand ... Ah, a brief sputter, then nothing. It seems the origin isn’t known for certain.

These days it’s just a joking conjuror’s incantation with no force behind it, like hocus pocus and other meaningless phrases. But the word is extremely ancient and originally was thought to be a powerful invocation with mystical powers.

What we know for sure is that it was first recorded in a Latin medical poem, De medicina praecepta, by the Roman physician Quintus Serenus Sammonicus in the second century AD. It’s believed to have come into English via French and Latin from a Greek word abrasadabra (the change from s to c seems to have been through a confused transliteration of the Greek). Serenus Sammonicus said that to get well a sick person should wear an amulet around the neck, a piece of parchment inscribed with a triangular formula derived from the word, which acts like a funnel to drive the sickness out of the body:

A B R A C A D A B R A
A B R A C A D A B R
A B R A C A D A B
A B R A C A D A
A B R A C A D
A B R A C A
A B R A C
A B R A
A B R
A B
A

However, it seems likely that abracadabra is older and that it derives from one of the Semitic languages, though nobody can say for sure, because there is no written record before Serenus Sammonicus. For what it’s worth, here are some theories:

•It’s from the Aramaic phrase avra kehdabra, meaning “I will create as I speak”.
•The source is three Hebrew words, ab (father), ben (son), and ruach acadosch (holy spirit).
•It’s from the Chaldean abbada ke dabra, meaning “perish like the word”.
•It originated with a Gnostic sect in Alexandria called the Basilidians and was probably based on Abrasax, the name of their supreme deity (Abraxas in Latin sources).
Fans of the Harry Potter books will know the killing curse, Avada Kedavra, in which J K Rowling seems to have combined the supposed Aramaic source of abracadabra with the Latin cadaver, a dead body.

 

 

Abracadabra - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Amram Kehati [2]claims that the source is Hebrew and the ABRACADABRA has to be read from right to left as in Hebrew. ABRACADABRA, when phonetically ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abracadabra

Abracadabra
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This article does not cite any references or sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (April 2009)

This article is about an incantational word. For other uses, see Abracadabra (disambiguation).
Abracadabra is a word used as an incantation.

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 See also
3 References
4 External links

[edit] History
The term originated from the Aramaic. The original Aramaic phrase was used with a Hebrew prefix Alef rather than the latter version with an Ayin. The difference was that the original meaning was "I will create, as I say," while the latter was "What was said has been done." The original Aramaic was either עַבְדָא כְּדַברָא, avda kedavra, which means, "what was said has been done," or עברא כדברא, avra kedavra, which means "what was said has come to pass" or "caused to perish like the word" or "I will create what is told." Over time, it was corrupted to its current pronunciation with the replacement of both "v" sounds with "b" sounds: b and v can be interchangeable in Aramaic.

The word is now commonly used as an incantation by stage magicians and their imitators. In ancient times, however, it was taken much more seriously as an incantation to be used as a cure for fevers and inflammations. The first known mention was in the 2nd century AD in a poem called De Medicina Praecepta by Serenus Sammonicus, physician to the Roman emperor Caracalla, who prescribed that the sufferer from the disease wear an amulet containing the word written in the form of an inverted cone:[1]

A - B - R - A - C - A - D - A - B - R - A
A - B - R - A - C - A - D - A - B - R
A - B - R - A - C - A - D - A - B
A - B - R - A - C - A - D - A
A - B - R - A - C - A - D
A - B - R - A - C - A
A - B - R - A - C
A - B - R - A
A - B - R
A - B
A

This, he explained, diminishes the hold over the patient of the spirit of the disease. Other Roman emperors, including Geta and Alexander Severus, were followers of the medical teachings of Serenus Sammonicus and are likely to have used the incantation as well.

Amram Kehati [2]claims that the source is Hebrew and the ABRACADABRA has to be read from right to left as in Hebrew. ABRACADABRA, when phonetically pronounced from right to left, reads in Hebrew ארבע-דאח-ארבע. The Hebrew word דאח is the word אחד with rearrangement of the letters. This was done to confuse the daemon or for various witchery reasons. The evil, dark forces and the daemons kingdom in the Jewish Kabbalah are represented by the number 9 (the Hebrew word תשעה) or the Hebrew letter ("טית "ט). Since the ABRACADABRA word has to diminish a letter a day for nine (9) days it has to have enough letters. The Hebrew word תשעה is too short because it has only four letters. Therefore, the Hebrew word ארבע-אחד-ארבע was created. The Hebrew word ארבע is the Hebrew word for the number 4 (four) and the Hebrew word אחד is the Hebrew word for the number 1 (one). Therefore, ארבע+אחד+ארבע equal 4+1+4=9 and it represents the dark forces and daemons kingdom. This explanation for ABRACADABRA succeeds where all other previous known explanations and sources did not explain why the patient has to wear the amulet for nine (9) days. In Hebrew the "ABRACADABRA" should read as "ארבעאחדארבע" and the amulet should be as follows:

א-ר-ב-ע-א-ח-ד-א-ר-ב-ע
ר-ב-ע-א-ח-ד-א-ר-ב-ע
ב-ע-א-ח-ד-א-ר-ב-ע
ע-א-ח-ד-א-ר-ב-ע
א-ח-ד-א-ר-ב-ע
ח-ד-א-ר-ב-ע
ד-א-ר-ב-ע
א-ר-ב-ע
ר-ב-ע
ב-ע
ע

 

[edit] See also
Wikisource has the text of the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica article Abracadabra.Avada Kedavra (Harry Potter)
Abrahadabra
Barbarous names
Hocus Pocus
Presto

[edit] References

[edit] External links
Abracadabra Robert Todd Carroll, Skeptic's Dictionary
Abracadabra
Abracadabra

 

 

abracadabra - Wiktionary
21 Jun 2009 ... I don't know all the theoretical abracadabra about how it works, ... Retrieved from "http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/abracadabra" ...
en.wiktionary.org/wiki/abracadabra

 

[edit] EnglishWikipedia has an article on:
Abracadabra
[edit] EtymologyMagical word used in certain Gnostic writings, relation to Greek Abraxas, a Gnostic deity.

It may also be a corruption of the Aramaic term עַבְדָא כְּדַברָא, avda kedavra; “what was said has been done”; or perhaps, עברא כדברא, avra kedavra; “what has said has come to pass.”

It may also be the combination of three hebrew words ארבע-אחד-ארבע when it is read from right to left [1] .

The Aramaic is the source of the Avada Kedavra killing curse in the Harry Potter books.

[edit] Pronunciation Audio (US)help, file

[edit] Interjectionabracadabra!

1.Used to indicate that a magic trick or other illusion has been performed.

[edit] NounSingular
abracadabra
Plural
uncountable

abracadabra (uncountable)

1.A mystical word or collocation of letters from kabbalism.
2.Complicated technicalities, jargon that one does not understand much if at all.
I don’t know all the theoretical abracadabra about how it works, I’m only its pilot.

[edit] TranslationsThe translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
Vietnamese: câu thần chú, lời nói khó hiểu

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[edit] French
[edit] Interjectionabracadabra !

1.abracadabra

[edit] Derived termsabracadabrant

[edit] Nounabracadabra m. (plural abracadabras)

1.An unspecified magical formula.
2.(historical) A mystical word from kabbalism.

 

 

TWILIGHT

TWO I LIGHT LIGHT I TWO

DARK LIGHT GODS LIGHT DARK

GODS LIGHT OF LIFE LIFE OF LIGHT GODS

HIGH LIGHT LOW LIGHT LIGHT LOW LIGHT HIGH

TWIN LIGHT TWO IN LIGHT IS LIGHT IN TWO LIGHT TWIN

CREATORS OF SPIRIT LIGHT GODS LIGHT SPIRIT OF CREATORS

DIVINE THOUGHT ALWAYS IS GODS IS ALWAYS THOUGHT DIVINE

REAL REALITY REVEALED GODS IS IS GODS REVEALED REAL REALITY

 

 

JUST SIX NUMBERS

Martin Rees

1
999

OUR

COSMIC

HABITAT

I

PLANETS STARS AND LIFE
Page 24

"A proton is 1,836 times heavier than an electron, and the number 1,836 would have the same connotations to any 'intelligence' "

Page 24 / 25

"A manifestly artificial signal- even if it were as boring as lists of prime numbers, or the digits of 'pi' - would imply that 'intelligence' wasn't unique to the Earth and had evolved elsewhere. The nearest potential sites are so far away that signals would take many years in transit. For this reason alone, transmission would be primarily one-way. There would be time to send a measured response, but no scope for quick repartee!
Any remote beings who could communicate with us would have some concepts of mathematics and logic that paralleled our own. And they would also share a knowledge of the basic particles and forces that govern our universe. Their habitat may be very different (and the biosphere even more different) from ours here on Earth; but they, and their planet, would be made of atoms just like those on Earth. For them, as for us, the most important particles would be protons and electrons: one electron orbiting a proton makes a hydrogen atom, and electric currents and radio transmitters involve streams of electrons. A proton is 1,836 times heavier than an electron, and the number 1,836 would have the same connotations to any 'intelligence able and motivated to transmit radio signals. All the basic forces and natural laws would be the same. Indeed, this uniformity - without which our universe would be a far more baffling place - seems to extend to the remotest galaxies that astronomers can study. (Later chapters in this book will, however, speculate about other 'universes', forever beyond range of our telescopes, where different laws may prevail.)
Clearly, alien beings wouldn't use metres, kilograms or seconds. But we could exchange information about the ratios of two masses (such as thc ratio of proton and electron masses) or of two lengths, which are 'pure numbers' that don't depend on what units are used: the statement that one rod is ten times as long as another is true (or false) whether we measure lengths / in feet or metres or some alien units"

 

 

HARMONIC 288

Bruce Cathie

1977

EIGHT

THE MEASURE OF LIGHT

Page 95

"The search for this particular value was a lengthy one and the clue that led me finally to a possible solution was a study of the construction of the Grand Gallery. The height of the Gallery was the first indication that it was not just an elaborate access passage. Previous measurements made by scientific investigators pointed to some interesting possibilities."

Page 95

"The value that I calculated for length was extremely close to that of the one published in Davidson and Aldersmith's book, their value being 1836 inches,"

Page 95/97
"A search of my physics books revealed that 1836 was the closest approximation the scientists have calculated to the mass / ratio of the positive hydrogen ion, i.e. the proton, to the electron."

 

 

THE TUTANKHAMUN PROPHECIES

Maurice Cotterell

1

999

Page 195

"Anderson's Constitutions of the Freemasons (1723) comments:
. . . the finest structures of Tyre and Sidon could not be compared with the Eternal God's Temple at Jerusalem. . . there were employed 3,600 Princes, or 'Master Masons', to conduct the w,ork according to Solomon's directions, with 80,000 hewers of stone in the mountains ('Fellow Craftsmen'), and 70,000 labourers, in all 153,600, besides the levy under Adoniram to work in the mountains of Lebanon by turns with the Sidonians, viz 30,000 being in all 183,600."

"being in all 183,600."

 

 

THE JUPITER EFFECT

John Gribbin and Stephen Plagemann

1977

Page 122

"Seventeen 'major historical earthquakes' are referred to in the report all of which occurred since 1836"

 

 

THE BIOLOGY OF DEATH

Lyall Watson 1974

Page 49
"As long ago as 1836, in a Manual of Medical Jurisprudence, this was said: 'Individuals who are apparently destroyed in a sudden manner, by certain wounds, diseases or even decapitation, are not really dead, but are only in conditions incompatible with the persistence of life."

 

 

The Abbe Sieyes author of the pamphlet What is the third estate? intrigued with Napoleon Bonaparte and became a Consul of the French Republic. www.age-of-the-sage.org/historical/biography/abbe_sieyes.html

 

Qu'est-ce que le tiers état? ( What is the third estate? ).

The Abbé Sieyès "... it was in Paris that he spent his last days in 1836."

 

 

JUST SIX NUMBERS

Martin Rees

1
999

OUR COSMIC HABITAT

PLANETS STARS AND LIFE

Page 24

A

proton

is

1,836 times heavier than an electron, and the number 1,836

would have the same connotations to any 'intelligence'

 

 

Daily Mail

Thursday, April 30, 2009

Page 69

"......... WOW........."

 

 

Daily Mirror

Friday, March 6, 2009

Page 19

"......... WOW........."

 

 

Daily Mail

Thursday, February 26, 2009

Page 34

".........999........."

 

 

Daily Mail

Tuesday, April 30, 2009

Page 33

".........Called 999........."

".........dialled 999........."

".........called 999........."

 

 

Daily Mail

Wednesday, March 4, 2009

By James Slack Home Affairs Editor

Page 4

Don't phone 999, simply send police a text message!

".........call 999........."

 

 

Daily Mirror

Friday, March 6, 2009

By Tom Pettifor

Page 19

".........dial 999........."

 

 

Daily Mirror

Friday, March 6, 2009

By Martin Fricker

Front Page

"IS THIS IT? THIS IS IT!"

 

 

SIMULATIONS OF GOD

THE SCIENCE OF BELIEF

John Lilly 1975

Page xi

"I am only an extraterrestrial who has come to the / Page xii / planet Earth to inhabit a human body, Everytime I leave this body and go back to my own civilization, I am expanded beyond all human imaginings, When I must return I am squeezed down into the limited vehicle."

 

 

MAN AND THE STARS

Duncan Lunan 1974

Page 219

"Planetary contact 3(c)-intellgence unrecognizable by physical form. In discussing the recognition problem, we have been assuming that manipulative appendages, etc., are essential for intelligence, that we have enough in common with "them" for there to be an appropriate, physical response to us. But suppose, after all, such features are not necessary for intelligence. There is a fantasy story about a university professor mysteriously translated into the body of a bull. After great efforts to communicate he finally gets the opportunity to write a message in the bloody sand of the slaughterhouse. Unfortunately, the man with the gun is iliterate - "another of those steers that do a 'crazy kind of dance." To get at case 3(c), we have to magnify that problem into an alien mind in a non­human body; could there be intelligences like Arthur C. Clarke's Atheleni, 12 unable to develop technology until they meet a race gifted with hands?

 

 

LOOKING FOR THE ALIENS

A PSYCHOLOGICAL, SCIENTIFIC AND IMAGINATIVE INVESTIGATION

Peter Hough & Jenny Randles 1991

12

Page 98

Somewhere over the Interstellar Rainbow

"In 1985, Glasgow University astronomer Professor Archie Roy was in buoyant mood. He told a journalist from the London Observer that, with new efforts to search the universe for intelligent signals, 'we can expect to make contact very quickly, probably within a decade.' He added that he thought civilizations were 'ten a penny' in the cosmos.

A year later, in an interview with Paul Whitehead in Flying Saucer Reuiew (volume 31, number 3,1986) Professor Roy confirmed this view by saying, 'if we are the product of natural evolution, it is highly improbable that we are alone in the universe.' Presumably this leaves the door open just in case we are not solely the product of natura1 processes (as scientists understandably assume), but are also the creation of a mystic force, otherwise known as God.

Roy actively pursues his broad1y based interest in this search. He subsequently became associated with Flying Saucer Review, and he has also become an active researcher and spokesperson in the heated debate over the potential 'alien' messages said by some to lie behind those crop circles recently found dotting the rural landscapes of our world.
However, the astronomer's seemingly reasonable hopes are, as yet, a long way from being fulfilled. Contact is proving unexpectedly elusive, which has led to some quite contradictory statements.

For instance, in 1981 Michael Papagiannis, of the astronomy department at Boston University, said that:

The euphoric optimism of the 'sixties and early 'seventies that communication with extraterrestrial civilizations seemed quite possible is being slowly replaced in the last couple of years by a pessimistic acceptance that we might be the only technological civilization in the entire galaxy.
(Royal Astronomical Society journal, volume 19, pp.277-281)

One can hardly find more polarized opinions than these, and they represent a crucial debate that increasingly dominates the field. While there seems to be a gut reaction based on deductive logic shared by most scientists, implying that life should be 'out there' in great abundance, there is mounting concern at our continued failure to find it.

Long before we understood the universe in any detail, we dreamt about this quest for alien life, and, as we have seen, still speculate on /Page 99 / what forms such beings might take. When science fiction became popular during the last century, we even began to wonder how we might establish contact.

Early ideas were ingenious, but impractical: such as building a giant mirror and using sunlight to send Morse-code signals to the (then still plausible) inhabitants of the moon or Mars. Of course, the limitations of physics meant that this could never work, even if there were Martians to see the signals. Only the brightest light that we can produce (a nuclear explosion) is potentially visible from another world and this lasts such a brief time that it is hardly likely to produce incontrovertible proof of life on earth. Alien scientists would dismiss any sightings just as freely as ours now reject claims about UFO appearances.

Another problem concerned the code to be used. How could the Martians have recognized the message, even if they had been able to see it? To thcm it would have been a meaningless series of flashes. How would they have unravelled any meaning bchind it?

This problem exists even if it is assumed (as it nearly always was back then) that Martians, although probably looking like bug-eyed monsters, would still think like human beings. The truth is surely that aliens would be alien in every way and their thought processes would not work in the same manner as ours. That said, the chances of any message from us to them being remotely comprehensible appear to be feeble.

In science-fiction stories and films, such a problem is largely ignored, but that is merely an expediency to help the plot along. We suspend scientific logic to accommodate the story line. However, in any real search for life in the universe, we cannot afford to ignore such scientific reasoning. This complicates matters so much that one or two researchers even think it is a forlorn task. We will never communicate with an alien intelligence, even if we do come across one by chance. The result will be like a farmer staring at a cow and attempting to convey, by spoken language or gesture, why it has to go peacefully to the slaughterhouse.
These problems receive too little attention, even today. Our ability to humanize the aliens is an extreme failure on our part, which academics refer to as 'anthropomorphism'

Page 99

"The result will be like a farmer staring at a cow and attempting to convey, by spoken language or gesture, why it has to go peacefully to the slaughterhouse"

 

 

MAN AND THE STARS

CONTACT AND COMMUNICATION WITH OTHER INTELLIGENCE

Duncan Lunan 1974

a

liberating adventure for mankind or a disaster

Page 219

Planetary contact 3(c) - intelligence unrecognizable by physical form.

"There is a fantasy story about a university professor mysteriously translated into the body of a bull. After great efforts to communicate he finally gets the opportunity to write a message in the bloody sand of the slaughterhouse."

 

 

HALLELUJAH

HURRAH FOR RAH FOR RAH HURRAH

HALLELUJAH

 

 

O

NAMUH

BELOVED CHILDREN OF THE LIGHT BLESSED

DREAMER OF DREAMS

AWAKEN

THE

ETERNAL MOMENT

BIRTHS

ITS

FUTURE

 

 

gayatri mantra
The first line: om bhur bhuvah svah that you see above is not actually part of a gayatri ... The first part of the gayatri mantra, om bhur bhuvah svah, ...
www.sanskrit.org/www/Hindu%20Primer/gayatri.html


Home Sanskrit Hindu
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A Hindu Primer
by
Shukavak N. Dasa

Copyright © 2007 Sanskrit Religions Institute
All rights reserved.

Gayatri Mantra
There is a famous prayer in Sanskrit that first appears in the Rig Veda (iii /62/10) called the gayatri mantra that almost every Hindu knows. In roman letters it is as follows:

Om bhur bhuvah svah
tat-savitur varenyam
bhargo devasya dhimahi
dhiyo yo nah pracodayat

Gayatri in Devanagari letters
Literally hundreds of books and thousands of web pages are currently dedicated to explaining the esoteric meaning of this mantra, so I will not repeat that discussion. Instead I will provide a basic grammatical explanation of this most famous mantra and if you are new to Hinduism and want to know at least one prayer, this is the prayer you should learn.

Gayatri is actually the name for a Sanskrit poetical meter that contains three lines of eight syllables each. There are, therefore, many gayatri mantras, but this particular one is the oldest and most well known of all gayatri mantras. In Hinduism all Gods and Goddesses have a gayatri mantra associated with them. There is a gayatri for Ganesha, one for Shiva, one for Durga, one for Vishnu, one for Lakshmi, and so on. Most people are unaware of this fact and when Hindus talk about the gayatri mantra they mean the gayatri mantra shown above, which is addressed to Savitri, the sun. The first line: om bhur bhuvah svah that you see above is not actually part of a gayatri mantra. It is a special utterance called vyahriti that has been added to the beginning of this famous gayatri . This vyahriti is important in and of itself and we will discuss it after we have explained the basic gayatri mantra. The three lines of this gayatri mantra are:

1. tat-savitur varenyam.

2. bhargo devasya dhimahi, and

3. dhiyo yo nah pracodayat

Here is a word-for-word breakdown of the gayatri mantra that most Hindus know.

tat–that (God)
savitur–of the sun
varenyam–the best
bhargo (bhargas)–light, illumination
devasya–divine
dhimahi–let us meditate (a verb)
dhiyo (dhiyah)–thought(s)
yo (yah)–which
nah–of us, our
pracodayat–May it push, inspire (a verb)

Savitri: the Sunrise
The deity associated with this gayatri mantra, as we mentioned, is the sun, savitri. (The second word of this mantra.) The more common name for the sun is surya. Generally "surya" is the name for the sun while it is above the horizon and savitri is the sun as it is rising and setting, just below the horizon. There is a great metaphor in Hinduism that when understood explains a lot about the Hindu way of seeing the universe. The metaphor is: “the sun equals light, which equals knowledge, which equals consciousness.” This metaphor applies not only to the gayatri mantra, but also to the design of temples and homes, and to details such as why we circumambulate from left to right and offer incense and lamps in a clockwise direction.

The most important word in the gayatri mantra is the word, “tat,” which is a neuter pronoun meaning “that.” It is a reference to “that One," God. According to the metaphor mentioned above, the sun, which is the source of illumination, heat, food and so many other things in our life, can naturally be seen as the “representative” or symbol of God in this world. There are two verbs in the gayatri mantra, dhimahi and prachodayat. Dhimahi means, “let us meditate.“ So, “let us meditate on the light (bhargo) of the sun which represents God.” This is the basic meaning of the first part of the gayatri mantra.

The second part is also straight forward. The verb prachodayat literally means , “it should push,” but in more poetic language we can translate it as “let it inspire.” Dhiyah is “thoughts,” so dhiyo yo nah prachodayat means, “may our thoughts be inspired” So the most literal meaning of the gayatri mantra is, “Let us meditate on the light of the sun which represents God, and may our thoughts be inspired by that divine light.”

Gayatri Devi
As with most things Hindu, the gayatri mantra is also personified as the Goddess, Gayatri Devi. She is the wife of Brahma and is pictured with five heads sitting on a lotus. She is the embodiment of the supreme brahman. You will also see other depictions of Gayatri Devi that vary somewhat.

The gayatri mantra is traditionally whispered into the ear of a young boy in a ceremony called The Thread Giving Ceremony (upanayana), which is one of the rites of passage followed by many Hindus. In addition, the gayatri mantra is repeated during daily prayers performed by many Hindus three times a day, while facing the sun: at sunrise, at noon and at sun set. It is also common to recite the gayatri as part of a havan, or to recite it in a collective way in temples or homes.

The Great Utterance

The first part of the gayatri mantra, om bhur bhuvah svah, which we mentioned at the beginning as not part of the mantra, is called vyahriti or the “great utterance.” This mantra is repeated not only in conjunction with the gayatri mantra, but also separately during havans or fire ceremonies. The word om is a auspicious sound made at the beginning of many prayers. The expression bhur bhuvah and svah is technical, but a simple way to think of it is as a “call to creation,” that the light of the sun (the light of God) shines on the earth (bhur), in the sky (bhuvah), and in space (svah), and therefore the implication is, “let that light also shine on me.”

The technical explanation vyahriti has to do with subtle practices of meditational yoga. This earth is simply one of many planes of existence. In fact, above this earth are six higher planes, heavens as it were. Including this earth, there are seven planes up (heavens) and seven planes down, or hells below this earth. The earth is in the middle. If you have ever heard the expression, “he is in seventh heaven” you should understand that this is a reference to the Hindu idea of heavens. The seventh heaven is the highest heaven. The first three of these planes starting with the earth are called bhur, bhuvah and svah. The utterance bhur bhuvah svah, therefore, refers to the first three subtle planes of existence that may be reached in meditation by a yogi.

Om bhur bhuvah svah
tat-savitur varenyam
bhargo devasya dhimahi
dhiyo yo nah pracodayat

 

 

OM BHUR BHUVAH SVAHA TAT SAVITUR VARENYAM
BHARGO DEVASYA DHIMAHI DHIYO YO NAH PRACODAYAT

 

Let us honor the unity of Divine Spirit
that pervades all realms of existance:
the earth, the atmosphere and the heavens.

May That most brilliant Divine Light
protect us, sustain us
and illuminate our consciousness

that we might realize
our inherent goodness,
our inborn divinity
and our unity with All That Is.

 

 

CHEIRO'S BOOK OF NUMBERS

Circa 1926

Page106
"Shakespeare, that Prince of Philosophers, whose thoughts will adorn English literature for all time, laid down the well-known axiom: There is a tide in the affairs of men which if taken at the flood, leads on to fortune." The question has been asked again and again, Is there some means of knowing when the moment has come to take the tide at the flood?
My answer to this question is that the Great Architect of the Universe in His Infinite Wisdom so created all things in such harmony of design that He endowed the human mind with some part of that omnipotent knowledge which is the attribute of the Divine Mind as the Creator of all.

"The question has been asked again and again, Is there some means of knowing when the moment has come to take the tide at the flood?

 

 THE

QUESTION

HAS BEEN ASKED AGAIN AND AGAIN

IS THERE SOME MEANS OF KNOWING WHEN THE MOMENT HAS COME TO TAKE

THE TIDE AT THE

FLOOD

 

 

EIGHTEEN+THIRTYSIX = 9 9 = EIGHTEEN+THIRTYSIX

1836

 

 

GOD WITH US AND US WITH GOD

 

 

HALLELUJAH HURRAH FOR RAH FOR RAH HURRAH HALLELUJAH

 

 

EGYPTIAN CHRONOLOGY

THE MYTHIC DYNASTIES

F. G. Fleay

1899

Page 93

GODS MEMPHITE SCHEME

"PTAH reigned for 9000 months"

 

 

YEA

THOUGH I WALK THROUGH

THE

VALLEY OF THE SHADOW OF DEATH

I

WILL FEAR NO EVIL FOR THOU ART WITH

ME

ALWAYS

 

 

JUST SIX NUMBERS

Martin Rees

1
999

OUR COSMIC HABITAT

PLANETS STARS AND LIFE

Page 24

A

proton

is

1,836 times heavier than an electron, and the number 1,836

would have the same connotations to any 'intelligence'

 

 

I

OSIRIS

UNAS OSIRIS AM I AM OSIRIS UNAS

AM

I

SOKAR OSIRIS AM I AM OSIRIS SOKAR

AM

I

I THAT AM THAT THAT THAT ISISISIS THAT THAT THAT AM THAT I

 

 

O

NAMUH

WHEN SHALL WE C THY LIKE AGAIN

 

 

I

ME

EGO

OGRE

CONSCIENCE

NAME ME I ME NAME

ME

AMEN

I MEAN NAME THAT NAME MEAN

 

 

I

I 9 I

ME

ME 45 EM

EGO 576 EGO

OGRE 6795 OGRE

CONSCIENCE 3651395535 CONSCIENCE

DIVINE THOUGHT GODS THOUGHT DIVINE

 

THIS IS THE SCENE OF THE SCENE UNSEEN

THE UNSEEN SEEN OF THE SCENE UNSEEN THIS IS THE SCENE

 

 

NAME ME I ME NAME

ME

AMEN

I MEAN NAME THAT NAME MEAN

 

 

THERE IS NO ATTEMPT MADE TO DESCRIBE THE CREATIVE PROCESS REALISTICALLY

THE ACCOUNT IS SYMBOLIC AND SHOWS GOD CREATING THE WORLD BY MEANS OF LANGUAGE

AS THOUGH WRITING A BOOK BUT LANGUAGE ENTIRELY TRANSFORMED

THE MESSAGE OF CREATION IS CLEAR EACH LETTER OF

THE

ALPHABET

IS

GIVEN

A

NUMERICAL

VALUE BY COMBINING THE LETTERS WITH THE SACRED NUMBERS

REARRANGING THEM IN ENDLESS CONFIGURATIONS

THE MYSTIC WEANED THE MIND AWAY FROM THE NORMAL CONNOTATIONS OF WORDS

 

....

ADDED TO ALL MINUS NONE SHARED BY EVERYTHING MULTIPLIED IN ABUNDANCE.

 

 

I

AM

WHOLE SOURCE AM I 9 I AM WHOLE SOURCE

AM

I

 

 

OSIRIS SO IRIS OSIRIS

SO IR IS IS IR SO

ISIS IS IS ISIS

OSIRIS SO IRIS OSIRIS

 

 

DIVINE LOVE IS 99 99 IS LOVE DIVINE

THE LIGHT IS RISING RISING IS THE LIGHT

 

 

ARISES THAT SUN SETS THAT SUN SETS THAT SUN ARISES THAT SUN

OSIRIS THAT SON SETS THAT SON SETS THAT SON OSIRIS THAT SUN

OSIRIS SO RI IS THAT SUNSETSUN IS RI SO OSIRIS

OSIRIS ISISISIS OSIRIS

BIRTHING THE NEW HORUS NEW THE BIRTHING

OSIRIS THAT SON SETS THAT SON SETS THAT SON OSIRIS THAT SUN

ARISES THAT SUN SETS THAT SUN SETS THAT SUN ARISES THAT SUN

 

 

THIS IS THE SCENE OF THE SCENE UNSEEN

THE UNSEEN SEEN OF THE SCENE UNSEEN THIS IS THE SCENE

 

 

IS

KRISHNA SHIVA VISHNU VISHNU SHIVA KRISHNA

IS

 

 

ZE US US ZE

C ZEUS C

C RHEA C

HEAR US C US HEAR

ZEUS SEE US US SEE ZEUS

 

 

THE HOURS OF HORUS NOW IS IS NOW THE HORUS OF HOURS

 

 

RA AR R RA AR

IS RA EL EL IS RA

IS REAL REAL IS

REAL REALITY REVEALED REALITY REAL IS

 

 

EARTH HEART R HEAT R HEART EARTH

EARTH HEART EARTH THERA TERAH

 

 

SELF FEELS SELF

SEE ELS FISH SELLS FISH ELS SEE

SELFISH SELLS ELS FISH ELS SELLS SELFISH

 

 

I

INCA

THE SON OF THE SUN

I

9531

THE SON OF THE SUN

I

9

THE SON OF THE SUN

I

9

 

 

ANUS RA'S ARS ARS RA'S ANUS

ANUS UR RU ANUS

ANU 153 ANU

153 ANU 153

ANU 153 ANU

ANUS A SUN A SUN ANUS

URANUS UR A SUN A SUN R U URANUS

 

 

SPINE PENIS IS IS PENIS SPINE

VAGINA V AGAIN AGAIN V VAGINA

MENSTRUATE MENS TRU-E HATE TRU-E MENS MENSTRUATE

MENOPAUSE MEN O PAUSE PAUSE O MEN MENOPAUSE

 

 

A

LINE A NILE A LINE

 

 

ALIEN IS IS ALIEN

 

 

ANUBIS A NUMBER IS IS A NUMBER ANUBIS

 

 

R U SOL SOL U R

SOUL SO U LIVE SOUL SO U LEARN SOUL SO U LOVE

R U SOL SOL U R

 

 

ABRAHAM A BRAHMAN IS IS ABRAHAM A BRAHMAN

 

 

SOLOMON SOL MOON MOON SOL SOLOMON

 

 

ERUSALEM JESU MALES R R MALES JESU JERUSALEM

JERU-SALEM MALES JERU-SALEM

 

 

MARY Y RAM MARY MARY Y RAM MARY

 

 

ISHI TELL IRISH RISHI HOW MANY FISH ISHI

 

 

ISHMAEL IS HE MALE MALE IS HE ISHMAEL

 

 

AND DNA AND DNA AND DNA AND DNA AND

 

 

HALAL ALLAH HALAL

TEAM TAME MEAT TAME TEAM

EAT TEA TEA EAT

TEAT TAKE IT EAT IT TAKE TEAT

 

 

FELT HAND LEFT HAND

FELT RIGHT FELT

 

 

EROS ROSE IS SORE IS ROSE EROS

 

 

MOUTH IS O IS MOUTH

 

 

BUDDHA BUD HAD HAD BUD BUDDHA

HASHISH HE HAS ISH ISH HAS HE HASHISH

HASHISH SHE HAS ISH ISH HAS SHE HASHISH

IS THAT IRISH HASHISH RISHI IS THAT IS IS THAT IRISH HASHISH RISHI THAT IS

 

 

THREAD R DEATH R THREAD

IM- MORTAL AM I AM MORTAL-IM

IMMORTAL AM I AM IMMORTAL

IMMORTAL THOU ART THOU IMMORTAL

 

 

I

SAY

HAVE

I

MENTIONED DIVINE THOUGHT DIVINE CONSCIENCE

I

SAY

HAVE

I

MENTIONED

GODS

DIVINE LOVE DIVINE

HAVE

I

MENTIONED

THAT

?

I

HAVE

O

GOOD

 

STRIKE A LIGHT

LUCIFER MEETS ITS MATCH

 

 

OSIRIS SO IRIS IS

 

 

ENTERS THE NETERS

 

 

8
EXOTERIC
99
45
9
8
ESOTERIC
94
40
4
16
First Total
193
85
13
1+6
Add to Reduce
1+9+3
8+5
1+3
7
Second Total
13
13
4
8
ESOTERIC
94
40
4
7
Essence of Number
4
4
4

 

 

-
ESOTERIC
-
-
-
1
E
5
5
5
1
S
19
10
1
1
O
15
6
6
1
T
20
2
2
1
E
5
5
5
1
R
18
9
9
1
I
9
9
9
1
C
3
3
3
8
ESOTERIC
94
49
40
-
-
9+4
4+9
4+0
8
ESOTERIC
13
13
4
-
-
1+3
1+3
-
8
ESOTERIC
4
4
4

 

 

-
ESOTERIC
-
-
-
1
E
5
5
5
3
SOT
54
18
9
1
E
5
5
5
1
R
18
9
9
1
I
9
9
9
1
C
3
3
3
8
ESOTERIC
94
49
40
-
-
9+4
4+9
4+0
8
ESOTERIC
13
13
4
-
-
1+3
1+3
-
8
ESOTERIC
4
4
4

 

 

-
ESOTERIC
-
-
-
5
ESOTE
64
28
1
1
R
18
9
9
1
I
9
9
9
1
C
3
3
3
8
ESOTERIC
94
49
40
-
-
9+4
4+9
4+0
8
ESOTERIC
13
13
4
-
-
1+3
1+3
-
8
ESOTERIC
4
4
4

 

 

-
ESOTERIC
-
-
-
1
I
9
9
9
6
SECRET
70
34
7
1
O
15
6
6
8
ESOTERIC
94
49
22
-
-
9+4
4+9
2+2
8
ESOTERIC
13
13
4
-
-
1+3
1+3
-
8
ESOTERIC
4
4
4

 

 

-
ESOTERIC
-
-
-
1
O
15
6
6
6
SECRET
70
34
7
1
I
9
9
9
8
ESOTERIC
94
49
22
-
-
9+4
4+9
2+2
8
ESOTERIC
13
13
4
-
-
1+3
1+3
-
8
ESOTERIC
4
4
4

 

 

-
16
O
-
S
E
C
R
E
T
-
I
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
+
=
16
1+6
=
7
=
7
=
7
-
-
15
-
19
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
+
=
43
4+3
=
7
=
7
=
7
-
16
O
-
S
E
C
R
E
T
-
I
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
3
9
5
2
-
-
+
=
24
2+4
=
6
=
6
=
6
-
-
-
-
-
5
3
18
5
20
-
-
+
=
51
5+1
=
6
=
6
=
6
-
16
O
-
S
E
C
R
E
T
-
I
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
15
-
19
5
3
18
5
20
-
9
+
=
94
9+4
=
13
1+3
4
=
4
-
-
6
-
1
5
3
9
5
2
-
9
+
=
40
4+0
=
4
=
4
=
4
-
16
O
-
S
E
C
R
E
T
-
I
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
``-
-
-
--
1
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
=
1
-
``-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
=
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
occurs
x
1
=
3
=
3
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
FOUR
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
occurs
x
2
=
10
1+0
1
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
occurs
x
1
=
6
=
6
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
SEVEN
7
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
EIGHT
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
9
-
-
9
occurs
x
2
=
18
1+8
9
19
16
O
-
S
E
C
R
E
T
-
I
-
-
26
-
-
8
-
40
-
22
1+9
1+6
-
---
-
-
-
9
-
-
---
9
-
-
2+6
-
-
-
-
4+0
-
2+2
10
7
O
-
S
E
C
R
E
T
-
I
-
-
8
-
-
8
-
4
-
4
1+0
-
6
-
1
5
3
9
5
2
-
9
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
7
O
-
S
E
C
R
E
T
-
I
-
-
8
-
-
8
-
4
-
4

 

 

16
O
-
S
E
C
R
E
T
-
I
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
+
=
16
1+6
=
7
=
7
=
7
-
15
-
19
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
+
=
43
4+3
=
7
=
7
=
7
16
O
-
S
E
C
R
E
T
-
I
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
3
9
5
2
-
-
+
=
24
2+4
=
6
=
6
=
6
-
-
-
-
5
3
18
5
20
-
-
+
=
51
5+1
=
6
=
6
=
6
16
O
-
S
E
C
R
E
T
-
I
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
15
-
19
5
3
18
5
20
-
9
+
=
94
9+4
=
13
1+3
4
=
4
-
6
-
1
5
3
9
5
2
-
9
+
=
40
4+0
=
4
=
4
=
4
16
O
-
S
E
C
R
E
T
-
I
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
--
1
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
=
1
``-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
=
2
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
occurs
x
1
=
3
=
3
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
occurs
x
2
=
10
1+0
1
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
occurs
x
1
=
6
=
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
9
-
-
9
occurs
x
2
=
18
1+8
9
16
O
-
S
E
C
R
E
T
-
I
-
-
26
-
-
8
-
40
-
22
1+6
-
---
-
-
-
9
-
-
---
9
-
-
2+6
-
-
-
-
4+0
-
2+2
7
O
-
S
E
C
R
E
T
-
I
-
-
8
-
-
8
-
4
-
4
-
6
-
1
5
3
9
5
2
-
9
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
O
-
S
E
C
R
E
T
-
I
-
-
8
-
-
8
-
4
-
4

 

 

-
16
O
S
E
C
R
E
T
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
1
-
-
-
-
-
9
+
=
16
1+6
=
7
=
7
=
7
-
-
15
19
-
-
-
-
-
9
+
=
43
4+3
=
7
=
7
=
7
-
16
O
S
E
C
R
E
T
I
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
3
9
5
2
-
+
=
24
2+4
=
6
=
6
=
6
-
-
-
-
5
3
18
5
20
-
+
=
51
5+1
=
6
=
6
=
6
-
16
O
S
E
C
R
E
T
I
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
15
19
5
3
18
5
20
9
+
=
94
9+4
=
13
1+3
4
=
4
-
-
6
1
5
3
9
5
2
9
+
=
40
4+0
=
4
=
4
=
4
-
16
O
S
E
C
R
E
T
I
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
``-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
=
1
-
``-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
=
2
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
occurs
x
1
=
3
=
3
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
FOUR
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
5
occurs
x
2
=
10
1+0
1
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
occurs
x
1
=
6
=
6
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
SEVEN
7
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
EIGHT
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
9
-
-
9
occurs
x
2
=
18
1+8
9
19
16
O
S
E
C
R
E
T
I
-
-
26
-
-
8
-
40
-
22
1+9
1+6
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
9
-
-
2+6
-
-
-
-
4+0
-
2+2
10
7
O
S
E
C
R
E
T
I
-
-
8
-
-
8
-
4
-
4
1+0
-
6
1
5
3
9
5
2
9
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
7
O
S
E
C
R
E
T
I
-
-
8
-
-
8
-
4
-
4

 

 

16
O
S
E
C
R
E
T
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
6
1
-
-
-
-
-
9
+
=
16
1+6
=
7
=
7
=
7
-
15
19
-
-
-
-
-
9
+
=
43
4+3
=
7
=
7
=
7
16
O
S
E
C
R
E
T
I
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
3
9
5
2
-
+
=
24
2+4
=
6
=
6
=
6
-
-
-
5
3
18
5
20
-
+
=
51
5+1
=
6
=
6
=
6
16
O
S
E
C
R
E
T
I
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
15
19
5
3
18
5
20
9
+
=
94
9+4
=
13
1+3
4
=
4
-
6
1
5
3
9
5
2
9
+
=
40
4+0
=
4
=
4
=
4
16
O
S
E
C
R
E
T
I
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
=
1
``-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
=
2
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
occurs
x
1
=
3
=
3
-
-
-
5
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
5
occurs
x
2
=
10
1+0
1
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
occurs
x
1
=
6
=
6
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
9
-
-
9
occurs
x
2
=
18
1+8
9
16
O
S
E
C
R
E
T
I
-
-
26
-
-
8
-
40
-
22
1+6
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
9
-
-
2+6
-
-
-
-
4+0
-
2+2
7
O
S
E
C
R
E
T
I
-
-
8
-
-
8
-
4
-
4
-
6
1
5
3
9
5
2
9
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
O
S
E
C
R
E
T
I
-
-
8
-
-
8
-
4
-
4

 

 

-
ESOTERIC
-
-
-
1
O
15
6
6
6
SECRET
70
34
7
1
I
9
9
9
8
ESOTERIC
94
49
22
-
-
9+4
4+9
2+2
8
ESOTERIC
13
13
4
-
-
1+3
1+3
-
8
ESOTERIC
4
4
4

 

 

-
8
E
S
O
T
E
R
I
C
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
6
-
-
-
9
-
+
=
16
1+6
=
7
=
7
=
7
-
-
-
19
15
-
-
-
9
-
+
=
43
4+3
=
7
=
7
=
7
-
8
E
S
O
T
E
R
I
C
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
2
5
9
-
3
+
=
24
2+4
=
6
=
6
=
6
-
-
5
-
-
20
5
18
-
3
+
=
51
5+1
=
6
=
6
=
6
-
8
E
S
O
T
E
R
I
C
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
19
15
20
5
18
9
3
+
=
94
9+4
=
13
1+3
4
=
4
-
-
5
1
6
2
5
9
9
3
+
=
40
4+0
=
4
=
4
=
4
-
8
E
S
O
T
E
R
I
C
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
=
1
-
``-
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
=
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
3
occurs
x
1
=
3
=
3
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
FOUR
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
occurs
x
2
=
10
1+0
1
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
occurs
x
1
=
6
=
6
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
SEVEN
7
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
EIGHT
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
9
-
-
-
9
occurs
x
2
=
18
1+8
9
19
8
E
S
O
T
E
R
I
C
-
-
26
-
-
8
-
40
-
22